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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 264 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

JUNE 27, 1862-6 a.m.

Captain CHAUNCEY McKEEVER:

Am just in from the front. Have placed Abercrombie's brigade on the line of advanced pickets and that of Sickles in charge of the lines of defense. On my left and Kearny's front I found the line established far inside of our old line. As this was done by troops not of my command, and not knowing by whose instructions they were acting, I had no remedy.

Please say to the general that I have 100 rounds of ammunition to the man, except in Grover's brigade, where they have but 90.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

McCLELLAN'S, June 27, 1862-10 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The night passed quietly. During it we brought all wagons, heavy guns, &c., to this side, and at daybreak drew in McCall's division about 3 miles. This change of position was beautifully executed under a sharp fire, with but little loss. The troops on the other side are now well in hand, and the whole army so concentrated that it can take advantage of the first mistake made by the enemy. White House yet undisturbed. Success of yesterday complete.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

McCLELLAN'S, June 27-12 m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

My change of position on other side just in time. Heavy attack now being made by Jackson and two other divisions. Expect attack also on this side.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

McCLELLAN'S, June 27, 1862-1 p.m.

(Received 3 p.m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your dispatch of noon received. I thank you for it. We are contending at several points against superior numbers. The enemy evince much desperation, but as we have no choice but to win, you may be sure that we will do all that can be expected. Thus far we have been successful, but I think the most severe struggle is to come. The enemy neglect White House thus far and bestow his whole attention on us.

If I am forced to concentrate between the Chickahominy and James, I will at once endeavor to open communication with you. All re-enforcements should for the present go to Fort Monroe, to which point I will send orders. It is absolutely certain that Jackson, Ewell, and Whiting are here. This may be the last dispatch I send you for some time.


Page 264 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
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