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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 51, Part 2 (Supplements)
Page 224 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE KANAWHA,
Camp Arbuckle, near Lewisburg, August 9, 1861.

Honorable L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: I met at Sweet Springs on my way to Jackson's River an order from General R. E. Lee, changing my direction to this quarter of the country, with directions to hold in check if possible the forces of General Cox, advancing from Gauley River and those under General Tyler coming from Summersville. I have come here accordngly, passing General Wise's command at White Sulphur Springs, where he has halted after falling back from Kanawha. The force under Cox and Tyler is, as far as I can ascertain, quite formidable. Their combined numbers will, it is confidently asserted, reach 10,000 men, well appointed and strong in field artillery. I think the number exaggerated in all probability. General Wise, I fear, is hardly in condition to render much efficient aid with his legion at the present moment. I send you a copy* of his reply to an inquiry of mine as to the force and arms ready for service. You will see from it also he intimates his action will be governed by orders from General Lee. I have not the least desire to exercise command over any but my own men, but the exact line of authority ought to be clearly defined and definitely settled, as as to give efficiency to the small forces we have in the west. I do not understand the relative authority between the State and Confederate officers, which I very much desire, that I may conform to your directions upon the subject. The enemy are ceratinly advancing upon this county from Kanawha and from Summersville. They propose to form a junction at a point thirty miles from this place and then march upon Greenbrier and Monroe Counties. You see from General Wise's letter the condition of his command. My own brigade is decimated with measles. Still if our arms and ammunition were here we would make a good stand with the numbers fit for duty. Our cavalry are useless for want of arms. Sabers and pistols for 400 men we xould get along with. Artillery is indispensable to us. The enemy are well supplied with it and we cannot well get along without it. Our people areted and the enemy much elated by the retrograde movement of General Wise, and every means should be taken with all promptness to restore the confidence of the country. If some authority was given by the Confederate Government to raise a force of militia under such men as you would designate to command the regiments, and efficient force could be speedily raised amongst the circumjacent counties. But in the meantime if two well armed and equipped regiments could be sent here from Covington it would be productive of the best consequences. I am quite sure that the country will in a reasonable time raise a sufficient force to defend itself and to drive the enemy across the Ohio.

With the highest respect, I am, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

[5.]


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE KANAWHA,
Camp Arbuckle, near Lewisburg, August 9, 1861.

Major General R. E. LEE:

SIR: I directed my course agreeably to your orders to prevent, if possible, the apprehended junction of the forces of General Cox and General Tyler in this county. I am now four miles west of Lewisburg, and after close observation and minute inquiry for three days I am satis-

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* Not found.

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Page 224 Chapter LXIII. MD., E. N. C., PA., VA., EXCEPT S. W., & W. VA.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 51, Part 2 (Supplements)
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