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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 53 (Supplements)
Page 196 S. C., S. GA., MID. & E. FLA., & WEST. N. C. Chapter LXV.


HEADQUARTERS,
Coosawhatchie, December 9,1 861.

Colonel O. E. EDWARDS,

Commanding Thirteenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers:

COLONEL: You will, with the effective men of your regiment, take the road to Garden's Corners, and halt at the first convenient spot beyond Pocotaligo. Should you receive no call from Colonel Dunovant for support, you will return to your encampment at this place. Tak one day's rations in the haversacks of your men, cooked, if practicable, and not over twenty rounds of ammunition in the cartridge-goxes.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

[6.]


HEADQUARTERS,
Coosawhatchie, December 9, 1861.

General R. S. RIPLEY:

GENERAL: In examining the report of Captain Ives of his inspection of the works proposed for the obstruction of the Combahee, Ashepoo, and Pon Pon Rivers, I have been pleased to observe that the selection of the site of the battery for the latter river at Wilton's bluff is admirably adapted for its defense, and that the construction of the battery has been energetically pushed forward by Captain Perrin. It also appears from his report that about 300 yards below the battery a shoal extends from the right bank of the river to within about fifty yards of the left, and that the depth of the channel at that point at low water is about thirteen feet. If the obstruction you propose to the navigation of the river were located at that point, the work required would to be great, and it would arrest the progress of the enemy within easy range of the battery and thus prevent its being forced. Moreover, the moral effect upon the men in the battery in knwoing that the enemy's progress would be arrested would be beneficial, their fire more steady, and their resistance more firm. I understand that the position selected for the proposed obstruction is above the battery. This may have its advnatages, but if the enemy can approach the batteries and drive off the garrison, he will have little difficulty, I fear, in passing the barrier. The benefit of placing the barrier below the battery is apparent in the obstruction you adopted for the Coosawhatchie, now under construction by General Gonzales. Unless there are circumstances which render a contrary course advisable at Wilton's Bluff, I suggest that you adhere to the same plan. If the obstruction has not been commenced above the battery, there will be no difficulty or delay in changing the location.

Yours, respectfully, &c.,

R. E. LEE,

General, Commanding.

[6.]


HEADQUARTERS,
Coosawhatchie, December 9, 1861.

Captain

CAPTAIN: The general commanding directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch, and to request that you will afford the officer commanding the forces such aid as you can in driving back the enemy should he attempt a landing on this side.

Respectfully, &c.,

W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[6.]


Page 196 S. C., S. GA., MID. & E. FLA., & WEST. N. C. Chapter LXV.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 53 (Supplements)
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