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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 194 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.

McCLELLAN'S, May 27, 1862 - 11.20 p. m.

(Received May 28 - 12.20 a. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Stoneman has captured an engine and six cars on Central Railroad. Sent them to communicate with Porter. The railway communications of Richmond are not as safe as they used to be. Nothing new from Porter. All is progressing very well. Please prevent the newspapers from publishing as much as they do now. They give the enemy too much information. Notwithstanding the trouble, I would be glad to have them required to submit all letters as well as telegraphs to these headquarters.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

MAY 27, 1862 - 6.30 p. m.

Major-General McCLELLAN:

General Banks made good his retreat across the river at Williamsport, saving nearly all his trains and with small loss to his command. Reports indicate that Jackson has fallen back rapidly. Shields and Fremont are after him. It is hoped that he may yet be caught. The Manassas road from Front Royal to Thoroughfare Gap was destroyed. A strong force, under General Saxton, holds Harper's Ferry. McDowell's force has advanced toward Hanover Junction, 18 miles below Fredericksburg, but found no force in front of them. The position of Anderson is not known, nor that of Jackson. We shall, I hope, be able to send you strong re-enforcements in two or three days, if you need them, as fast as they come in from the States and transportation can be had. The Vanderbilt has been ordered around to Annapolis to receive them.

The attack upon Banks was a bold and sudden push by Jackson, that surprised the troops at Front Royal. The affair has served to quicken the spirit in the States, and will bring in fresh troops with rapidity.

It may save some time if you find that you have arms and equipments to forward them, to be armed on reaching Yorktown. I have assumed that to be the proper place to send them. But if you would rather have them at some other place, please mention it.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

McCLELLAN'S, May 27, 1862 - 8.30 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I find some of the newspapers frequently publish letters from their correspondents with this army, giving important information concerning our movements, positions of troops, &c., in positive violation of your orders. As it is impossible for me to ascertain with certainty who these anonymous writers are, I beg to suggest that another order be published holding the editors responsible for its infraction.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding.


Page 194 THE PENINSULAR CAMPAIGN, VA. Chapter XXIII.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
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