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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 27, Part 1 (Gettysburg Campaign)
Page 92 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

advanced division of General Couch's forces, has arrived here to-day, but from the organization and condition of these troops, and the short time they have to serve, I cannot place much reliance upon them. Difficulties arising with the troops sent me whose terms of service are about expiring, respecting the dates at which they expire, I beg to be informed by the Department upon that head respecting each such regiment sen to me.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 13, 1863-9. 30 p. m.

Major General GEORGE G. MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

Yours of 5 p. m. is received. You are strong enough to attack and defeat the enemy before he can effect a crossing. Act upon your own judgment and make your generals execute your orders. Call no council of war. It is proverbial that councils of war never fight. Re-enforcements are pushed on as rapidly as possible. Do not let the enemy escape.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
July 14, 1863-11 a. m. (Received 12. 10 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

On advancing my army this morning, with a view of ascertaining the exact position of the enemy and attacking him if the result of the examination should justify me, I found, on reaching his lines, that they were evacuated. I immediately put my army in pursuit, the cavalry in advance. At this period my forces occupy Williamsport, but I have not yet heard from the advance on Falling Waters, where it is reported he crossed his infantry on a bridge. Your instructions as to further movements, in case the enemy are entirely across the river, are desired.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., July 14, 1863-1 p. m.

Major-General MEADE,

Army of the Potomac:

The enemy should be pursued and cut up, wherever he may have gone. This pursuit may or may not be upon the rear or flank, as circumstances may require. The inner flank toward Washington presents the greatest advantages. Supply yourself from the country as far as possible. I cannot advise details, as I do not know where Lee's army is, nor where your pontoon bridges are. I need hardly say to you that the escape of Lee's army without another battle has created great dissatisfaction in the mind of the President, and it will require an active and energetic pursuit on your part to remove the impression that is has not been sufficiently active heretofore.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.


Page 92 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 27, Part 1 (Gettysburg Campaign)
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