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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 36, Part 1 (Wilderness-Cold Harbor)
Page 69 Chapter XLVIII. GENERAL REPORTS.

SPOTSYLVANIA BATTLE-FIELD, May 13, 1864-8 a.m. (Received 4.20 p.m.)

Lee abandoned his position during the night-whether to occupy a new one in the vicinity or to make a thorough retreat is not determined. One division of Wright's and one of Hancock's are engaged in settling this question, and at 7.30 a.m. had come upon his rearguard. Though our army is greatly fatigued from the enormous efforts of yesterday the news of Lee's departure inspires the men with fresh energy. The whole force will soon be in motion, but the heavy rain of the last thirty-six hours renders the roads very difficult for wagons and artillery. Our losses in killed and wounded in yesterday's battle will not vary much from 6,000. The proportion of severely wounded is greater than in either of the previous days' fighting. This was owing to the great use made of artillery.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

SPOTSYLVANIA COURT-HOUSE, VA.,

May 13, 1864-6 p.m. (Received 12.30 p.m., 14th.)

The impression that Lee had started on his retreat to Richmond which prevailed at the date of my dispatch of this morning is not confirmed. Our skirmishers have found the rebels along the whole line, and the conclusion now is that their retrograde movement of last night was made to correct their position after the loss of the key-points taken from them yesterday, and that they are still before us in force. Of course we cannot determine without a battle whether their whole army is still here, and nothing has been done to-day to provoke one. It has been necessary to rest the men, and accordingly we have everywhere stood upon the defensive. Still there has been a good deal of picket firing, and on Warren's front an occasional sound of artillery. In changing his lines Lee has left more uncovered the roads leading southward along his right wing, and Grant has ordered Meade to throw the corps of Warren, which now holds the right, and the corps of Wright, which holds the center of Meade's army, to the left of Burnside, leaving Hancock upon our right. This maneuver will be executed immediately after dark to-night, and, if not interrupted, will turn Lee's flank and compel him to move southward. In the skirmishing this morning Colonel Carroll, one of the most brilliant and daring officers of the Army of the Potomac, lost an arm. The number of cannon actually captured yesterday now appears to be reduced to 18. The prisoners are 3,500. About 150 more have been picked up to-day. Nothing more from Sheridan.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

BATTLE-FIELD OF SPOTSYLVANIA,

May 14, 1864-5.30 a.m. (Received 7.40 a.m., 15th.)

The movement of the Fifth and Sixth Corps to our left was executed during the night. They were to have attacked at daylight,


Page 69 Chapter XLVIII. GENERAL REPORTS.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 36, Part 1 (Wilderness-Cold Harbor)
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