eHistory logo Primary Sources Section
Primary Sources Home | Search eHistory

The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

You are currently in Volume XLII | Pages range from 1 to 1040

Go to Page (current volume):  
Index | Previous | Next
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 42, Part 1 (Richmond-Fort Fisher)
Page 37 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

This decided success is due to the personal exertions of General Hancock, and, in a great measure, to the conspicuous gallantry of Brigadier-General Egan, temporarily commanding a division in the Second Corps. The lateness of the hour at which this attack was made, and at which the information reached me, prevented General Crawford being sent of re-enforce General Hancock. Indeed, the distance and difficulty of moving through the dense thicket, together with the fact that Crawford was engaged with the enemy, induced me to put Ayres' division in motion, but it was dark before he could be crossed over the run at Armstrong's Mill. The position of the enemy being such, holding as it were, a ridge formed by his entrenched line in front of the run, and the run in rear, and forcing a separation of my flanks of over six miles, when he had only tow miles to move, deterred me from keeping Hancock in position and re-enforcing him with another corps, as it would leave only one corps to meet the attack of the enemy, if he should choose to move over. I therefore directed the withdrawal of Hancock and Crawford, who both recrossed the run by 7 a. m. to-day. About 12 ., having withdrawn all the impedimenta of the army, the several corps were, in accordance with the lieutenant-general's orders, withdrawn, and acre now moving into their former positions in the entrenched lines. In addition to the 7000 prisoners taken by the Second Corps, there were nearly 200 taken by Crawford. No prisoners are reported as lost by us, except the stragglers, whom it is always difficult to collect when withdrawing. No return of the casualties has yet been made. In the Second Corps the losses, owing to the severe fighting, are believed to be heavy. I regret to report that, owing to the want of transportation and the character of the cases, some of the most severely wounded were left in charge of surgeons in some houses on the field.

Very respectfully, &c.,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Lieutenant-Colonel BOWERS.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
December 14, 1864.

Although Warren was called upon last evening on receipt of your telegram, and again this morning, I am yet without any further details than those transmitted in his dispatch of the 11th.* In the absence of a report from Warren, I have made a resume of the operations from my personal knowledge, which I send for your consideration.

As soon as Warren's report is received it will be transmitted.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
December 14, 1864.

On the 7th instant Major-General Warren, commanding the Fifth Corps, Mott's division, Second Corps, and Gregg's division of cavalry,

---------------

* See p. 25.

---------------


Page 37 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 42, Part 1 (Richmond-Fort Fisher)
Index | Previous | Next
This symbol external link icon indicates an external link
All images and content are the property of eHistory at The Ohio State University unless otherwise stated.
Copyright © 2014 OSU Department of History. All rights reserved. [citation and copyright information]
eHistory icon