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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 3, vol 2, Part 1 (Union Letters, Orders, Reports)
Page 584 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

The splendid valor of our soldiers, their patient endurance, their manly patriotism, and their devotion to duty, demand from us and from all their countrymen the homage of the sincerest gratitude and the pledge of our constant re-enforcement and support. A just regard for these brave men, who we have contributed to place in the field, and for the importance of the duties which may lawfully pertain to us hereafter, has called us into friendly conference. And now presenting to our National Chief Magistrate this conclusion of our deliberations, we devote ourselves to our country's service, and will surround the President with our constant support, trusting that the fidelity and zeal of the loyal States and people will always assure him that he will be constantly maintained in pursuing with the utmost vigor this war for the preservation of the national life and the hope of humanity.

A. G. CURTIN.

JOHN A. ANDREW.

RICHARD YATES.

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

EDWARD SOLOMON.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

O. P. MORTON.

By D. G. ROSE, his representative.

WM. SPRAGUE.

F. H. PEIRPOINT.

DAVID TOD.

N. S. BERRY.

AUSTIN BLAIR.

GENERAL ORDERS,
WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 139.
Washington, September 24, 1862.

The following proclamation by the President is published for the information and government of the Army and all concerned:

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A PROCLAMATION.

I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy thereof, do hereby proclaim and declare that hereafter, as hereafter, the war will be prosecuted for the object of practically restoring the constitutional relation between the United States and each of the States, and the people thereof, in which States that relation is or may be suspended or disturbed.

That it is my purpose upon the next meeting of Congress to again recommend the adoption of a practical measure tendering pecuniary aid to the free acceptance of rejection of all slave States, so called, the people whereof may not then be in rebellion against the United States, so called, the people whereof may not then be in rebellion against the United States, and which States may then have voluntarily adopted, or thereafter may voluntarily adopt, immediate or gradual abolishment of slavery within their respective limits; and that the effort to colonize persons of African descent, with their consent, upon this continent or elsewhere, with the previously obtained consent of the governments existing there, will be continued.

That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, henceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom.


Page 584 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 3, vol 2, Part 1 (Union Letters, Orders, Reports)
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