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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 7, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
Page 1104 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.


HEADQUARTERS MILITARY PRISON,
Elmira, N. Y., November 6, 1864.

Colonel B. F. TRACY, Commanding Post:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at his station for the week ending November 6, 1864:

Conduct, good; cleanliness, good, considering the limited supply of clothing; clothing, there is some destitution, a requisition has been for warded; bedding, there are ticks, men in barracks sleep on boards, those in tents, on the ground; state of quarters, not good; state of mess-houses, good; state of kitchen, good; food, quality of, usually good, some fresh beef has been issued unfit to eat; food, quantity of, full rations allowed to prisoners; water, good and plenty; sinks, good; police of grounds, fair; drainage, fair, except the pond; police of hospital, good; attendance of sick, good; hospital diet, good; general health of prisoners, improving; vigilance of guard, good.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. MUNGER,

Captain, Forty-fourth New York Volunteers, Inspecting Officer.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to the Commissary-General of Prisoners.

Barracks progress slowly. We have been delayed for want of timber. It is now being supplied and we hope to have no further delay.

B. F. TRACY,

Colonel 127th U. S. Colored Troops, Commanding Depot.


HEADQUARTERS POST,
Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., November 6, 1864.

Colonel B. J. SWEET, Commanding Post, Chicago, Ill.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following inspection report of the condition of the prisoners of war at this station for the week ending November 6, 1864.

Conduct, good, with the exception of a part of Morgan's command; cleanliness, very good, except the last arrivals; clothing, fair, except the last arrivals; being, fair, except the last arrivals; state of quarters, clean and in good repair, except a few of the roofs; state of kitchen, very good, thoroughly clean; food, quality of, good, same as issued to garrison; food, quantity of, sufficient for good health; water, good, but not quite enough of it; sinks are placed over a sewer and cleaned daily; police of grounds, good; drainage, fair; police of hospital, fair; attendance of sick, the sick in hospital are well cared for; have plenty of attendants; hospital diet, the hospital is well supplied with food necessary for the sick; general health of prisoners is good with the exception of cases of smallpox; vigilance of guard, guards perform their duty well.

Remarks and suggestions. -The barracks have each of them a good coal stove with plenty of fuel, rendering the quarters very comfortable. I would respectfully suggest that the prisoners be allowed to receive from their friends uncooked garden vegetables, such as onions, potatoes, cabbage, turnips, &c. I am of the opinion that it would prevent disease, especially scurvy, and hence consider it a matter of economy to the Government. Complaints are made by hospital attendants that the convalescents are retained in hospital after they are able to be returned to barracks. Also, surgeons in attendance in the prison square


Page 1104 PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE, ETC.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 2, vol 7, Part 1 (Prisoners of War)
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