eHistory logo Primary Sources Section
Primary Sources Home | Search eHistory

The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

You are currently in Volume XLVI | Pages range from 2 to 1414

Go to Page (current volume):  
Index | Previous | Next
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 46, Part 3 (Appomattox Campaign)
Page 1360 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.


HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,
March 28, 1865.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

General Gary's and the Texas scouts report Sheridan's force to have crossed James River at Tilghman's Gate; the cavalry picket at New Market Heights in the same position; Kautz's command thought still on this side.

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.


HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,
March 28, 1865.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding, &c.:

Your telegram asking if we can spare General Pickett's division as a supporting force to our cavalry is received. I suggested that it should be sent on that service because I was apprehensive that our railroad would be in danger of being broken up behind us, leaving us without supplies sufficient to hold Richmond until our communication south could be re-established; or in case Sheridan went to North Carolina, his mounted force would be too formidable for that of General Johnston's, and that General Johnston's army would be in great danger if we should not re-enforce him. i do not think that we can well spare the division, but I hink that we would choose a lesser risk by sparing it in case Sheridan's cavalry makes either of these moves contemplated than we would by holding him here to await the result of these operations. The enemy seems now to count upon taking Richmond by raiding upon our lines of communication and not by attacking our lines of work. I think, therefore, that we should endeavor to put a force in the field that can contend against that of the enemy. If Grant sends off his cavalry he can hardly intend to make any general move of his main army until its return. In every aspect of affairs, so far as I am advised, I think that the greater danger is from keeping to close within our trenches. If we can remain where we are, independently of the railroad, and if General Johnston would be safe with such a force operating against him in addition to Sherman's, we had better keep the division here. You know much more about all those points than I do and are much better able to decide upon them. My supply train is in from Northern Neck and starts back to-morrow for other provisions. If there is any impropriety in sending it back please telegraph me as soon as you receive it that I amy recall it. We have about 100,000 pounds of meat near Dublin and 18,000 at New Boston. The commissary of subsistence complains that the railroad agents will not ship the meat unless it is boxed. This cannot always be done. If you can in any way aid us in this matter we shall do very well for some time to come.

I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.


HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS,
March 28, 1865.

Colonel S. R. JOHNSTON,

Engineers, &c.:

Both of the small dams near the Williamsburg road need repairs and completion. They should be raised as high as their bases and the surrounding


Page 1360 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 46, Part 3 (Appomattox Campaign)
Index | Previous | Next
This symbol external link icon indicates an external link
All images and content are the property of eHistory at The Ohio State University unless otherwise stated.
Copyright © 2014 OSU Department of History. All rights reserved. [citation and copyright information]
eHistory icon