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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 46, Part 3 (Appomattox Campaign)
Page 664 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

the United States, their reverence and honor, have been deserved and will be rendered to you and the brave and gallant officers and soldiers of your army for all time.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 9, 1865-11 p. m.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

Some thousands of our prisoners in the hands of the rebels are still undelivered. Can any arrangements be made to hasten their release?

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.


HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,
April 9, 1865.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding C. S. Army:

GENERAL: Your note of yesterday is received. As I have no authority to treat on the subject of peace the meeting proposed for 10 a. m. to-day could lead to no good. I will state, however, general, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertain the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms they will hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed. Sincerely hoping that all our difficulties may be settled without the loss of another life, I subscribe myself.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General, U. S. Army.

APRIL 9, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel U. S. GRANT,

Commanding U. S. Armies:

GENERAL: I received your note of this morning on the picket-line, wither I had come to meet you and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposal of yesterday with reference to the surrender of this army. I now request an interview in accordance with the offer contained in your letter of yesterday for that purpose.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

APRIL 9, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding U. S. Armies:

GENERAL: I ask a suspension of hostilities pending the adjustment of the terms of the surrender of this army, in the interview requested in my former communication to-day.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.


Page 664 N. AND SE. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 46, Part 3 (Appomattox Campaign)
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