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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 36, Part 1 (Wilderness-Cold Harbor)
Page 918 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.

ing a terrible fire from the enemy. On the 19th, at 2 a. m., left our position and moved about 3 miles to the extreme left of the army, and went into position near the Quesenberry house, and at 10 a. m. same day the Fourth and Tenth Regiments of U. S. Infantry made a reconnaissance in force to ascertain the position of the enemy. The officers and men behaved with great gallantry, and deserve much credit. On the 20th of May made a reconnaissance in force, swinging the whole line to the right, about 2 miles, for the purpose of feeling the position of the enemy. On the 21st, at 5 p. m., moved to the North Anna River, by the way of Guiney's Station, Clinton, Va., &c. On the morning of the 24th I crossed my brigade from the north to the south bank of the North Anna River, by wading the stream 1 mile above Ox Ford, for the purpose of flanking the enemy, and formed line of battle and pushed forward, driving the rebels into their entrenchments about 1 1/2 miles from the river, but having found the enemy posted in very strong force, the brigade held this position until ordered to fall back, the enemy at the same time attacking me with two divisions of Hill's corps, but failed to carry out their intentions of flanking me.

And here I would refer with pleasure to the gallant services of Major J. St. C. Morton, of the U. S. Engineers, on the staff of Major-General Burnside. He volunteered his services to me in a trying moment, and gallantly led a charge of one of my regiments upon the enemy, inspiring the troops by his courage and bravery. My thanks are due for his valuable aid on this occasion. The brigade held position on the south bank of the North Anna until the 27th, when the brigade recrossed the river and held Jericho Ford, to cover the crossing of the Fifth Army Corps. On the 28th marched all day and night, and crossed the Pamunkey River near Hanover Court-House. Continued the march on the 29th, and formed in line of battle near Four Corners, and proceeded to throw up earth-works, but before completion the work was ordered to be suspend. On the 30th of May I was ordered to take position on the right of the Fifth Corps, and on the 31st I threw out skirmishers and took possession of the enemy's rifle-pits, occasioning a small loss to the brigade.

At midnight of the 1st of June the skirmishers were withdrawn, and on the 2nd of June I was ordered to move to the rear, and take up a new position. My pickets were attacked at this point and driven in, but the attack was promptly met by my command and the enemy repulsed. In the afternoon moved about 1 mile and took a new position near Bethesda Church. On the 3rd my brigade was ordered to support the Third Division, General Willcox. On the 5th of June I was ordered into position on the extreme right of the army, where earth-works were thrown up; and on the 7th of June my brigade swung around on the prolongation of the main line of battle, it being formed previously at a right angle, or nearly so, to the main line.

In all of the engagements above referred to the Fourth and Tenth Regiments of U. S. Infantry have borne a conspicuous part, and the determined courage and resistance of the officers and men of these regiments deserve especial mention. Though few in number, and most of the time commanded and the enemy repulsed. In the afternoon moved about 1 mile and took a new position near Bethesda Church. On the 3rd my brigade was ordered to support the Third Division, General Willcox. On the 5th of June I was ordered into position on the extreme right of the army, where earth-works were thrown up; and on the 7th of June my brigade swung around on the prolongation of the main line of battle, it being formed previously at a right angle, or nearly so, to the main line.

In all of the engagements above referred to the Fourth and Tenth Regiments of U. S. Infantry have borne a conspicuous part, and the determined courage and resistance of the officers and men of these regiments deserve especial mention. Though few in number, and most of the time commanded by lieutenants, their marked bravery and intrepidity calls for the highest encomiums of praise.

I have to record the loss of a brave and gallant officer in the person of Lieutenant-Colonel Chandler, of the Fifty-seventh Massa-


Page 918 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter XLVIII.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 36, Part 1 (Wilderness-Cold Harbor)
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