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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 36, Part 1 (Wilderness-Cold Harbor)
Page 79 Chapter XLVIII. GENERAL REPORTS.

strongly intrenched and perfectly safe, even if Lee should attempt to push his whole army upon either division of ours. Numerous bridges are being thrown across the North Anna to connect our two wings. General Grant last night made an order assigning the Ninth Corps to the Army of the Potomac. Sheridan is up where his troops can be used. A strong force is at work to-day destroying the Virginia Central Railroad.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.


HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMIES,
Quarles' Ford, Va., May 26, 1864-8 a.m. (Received 9 p.m.)

Headquarters was brought back to the north side of the river last evening. Orders from moving the army were made last night. The trains and spare artillery of Wright and Warren were ordered north of the river, and thence to move as far as convenient, without exciting the attention of the rebels, on road toward Hanover Ferry, over the Pamunkey. Wright was directed to select his best division and move it in the night, without trains, in the same direction, taking care not to develop the movement to the enemy. The division was to halt at daylight, and wait for night again. Its place in the line in front of the enemy, of course, is filed up in a manner to conceal his absence. To-night the whole of the Fifth and Sixth Corps, with Crittenden's division, of the Ninth Corps, also withdraw to north bank, and push forward toward same crossing. This afternoon a heavy force of cavalry moves out to the Pamunkey and seizes the ferry in question, with as many other crossing as possible, followed with all practicable rapidity by the advance division and by the Fifth and Sixth Corps. Hancock follows as soon as road is clear. His trains and spare cannon came back over the North Anna beforehand. Potter's division, of the Ninth Corps, remains with him till he crosses. The Ninth Corps will form the rear guard of the new southward movement. Crittenden's loss in the affair of the 24th does not exceed 450 men. Of these 150 were killed or wounded; of the remaining 300 he thinks only a few were captured, and the most of the missing are straggling in the woods. It was Ledlie's brigade that suffered this loss, and it was attacking instead of being attacked. Ledlie attempted to take a rebel battery, and was repulsed. One of the most important results of the campaign thus far is the entire change which has taken place in the feelings of the armies. Rebels have lost all confidence, and are already morally defeated. This army has learned to believe that it is sure of victory. Even our officers have ceased to regard Lee as an invincible military genius. On part of the rebels this change is evinced, not only by their not attacking, even when circumstances seem to invite it, but by the unanimous statements of prisoners taken from them. Rely upon it the end is near as well as sure.

C. A. DANA.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.


Page 79 Chapter XLVIII. GENERAL REPORTS.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 36, Part 1 (Wilderness-Cold Harbor)
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