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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 25, Part 2 (Chancellorsville)
Page 703 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. He went as far as Ellicott's Mills, and has just returned. He corroborates the reports we have already received that the Ninth Corps [Burnside's] has gone west, and says it counted five divisions. They were all infantry, transportation for the whole force requiring forty-seven trains.

The troops had been encamped for several days in the neighborhood of Baltimore previous to their departure west, and he was able to converse with them at the stopping places on the road. He reports that the men were unwilling to be transferred from the Eastern to the Western Department; that they were tired of the war; expressed apprehension on account of their health, going west, and deserted on their journey whenever opportunity offered.

I am, with much respect, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

CONFIDENTIAL.] HDQRS. ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

April 4, 1863.

Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have read with much pleasure your letter of the 31st ultimo, and am gratified to learn that you are using every means in your power to augment our supplies and cause them to be distributed with regularity and equality.

General W. H. F. Lee's cavalry brigade is now moving from our extreme right to the Upper Rappahannock. It has been drawing its supplies during the winter from Essex and Middlesex Counties, and has drawn from the counties in the Northern Neck cattle and bacon sufficient for their subsistence. Perhaps the commissary agent could continue to draw supplies from this section; if so, it ought not to be neglected.

My object in transferring this brigade from our right to our left, in addition, to the cavalry re-enforcement it will give to our line on the Upper Rappahannock, was to enable me to throw forward Fitz. Lee's brigade into Loudoun, with a view of collecting all the supplies possible.

I respectfully request that you advise the Commissary General of this movement, and urge upon him the importance of immediately setting his agents to work to draw out all the subsistence for which he can obtain transportation.

As the enemy has a large force of cavalry in that region, I do not know how long I shall be able to keep this small brigade so far advanced, as I presume he will concentrate his forces upon it as soon as its position is known.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.


HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, April 4, 1863.

Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON,
Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to receive your letter of the 1st instant, in reply to my application that 100 slaves be employed in the reparation of the Virginia Central Railroad.


Page 703 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 25, Part 2 (Chancellorsville)
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