eHistory logo Primary Sources Section
Primary Sources Home | Search eHistory

The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

You are currently in Volume XIV | Pages range from 1 to 1026

Go to Page (current volume):  
Index | Previous | Next
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 14, Part 1 (Secessionville)
Page 527 Chapter XXVI. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.


HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Charleston, May 31, 1862.

W. J. MAGRATH:

SIR: It is very desirable to keep open the direct communication between Charleston and Savannah. I have not sufficient force at my disposal to station troops at all the assailable points. Any disposition made must have in view availability for the defense of Charleston and Savannah. If the company will agree to keep sufficient rolling stock always ready to move, and at a cost to the Confederate Government of the running expenses only, I will, so long as it shall be practicable, keep a regiment of infantry and a section or more of artillery, in addition to the cavalry already on the line of road, at some convenient and healthy point, say McPhersonville, and the rolling stock to be habitually near the Salkehatchie Station to avail of the turn-table for movements in either direction. I shall also expect the regiment to be moved in the first instance free of expence.

I am, &c.,
J. C. PEMBERTON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Charleston, May 31, 1862.

Colonel A. L. LONG,

Military Secretary to Commanding General:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of General Lee's letter of the 29th instant in regard to the disaffection of the garrison of Fort Sumter to which the general refers. I have to say that after as thorough an investigation as the nature of the allegations would admit of I have arrived at the conclusion that there is no real cause for apprehension.

The officers of the garrison express full confidence in the integrity, courage, and discipline of their men. I presume that in all commands of several hundred men there are some few discontended, and perhaps in heart disloyal; but I see no reason to suspect the garrisons of Forts Sumter and Moultrie to be less trustworthy than others. It would be, as the general must be aware, a very difficult matter to replace these men by others of anything like the same efficiency; they are admirably well drilled, and are in that invaluable in their present position. I presume the general has heard all the reports which have reached me on this subject. If he considers it advisable to make changes in the garrison it can be done, but I do not myself think it necessary. I am fully alive to the necessity of the greatest vigilance on our part to make up as far as possible for the very considerable reduction of force; so great indeed of the Charleston and Savannah Railroad almost entirely.

The general may feel assured that I appreciate the vast importance of the two cities, and that I will do my best to defend them to the last extremity.

If it is possible to give me more heavy guns I beg that they may be sent at once. I desire to establish heavy batteries in and about the city; but I can have no guns for them until the obstructions between Sumter and Moultrie are completed unless they are furnished from other places.


Page 527 Chapter XXVI. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 14, Part 1 (Secessionville)
Index | Previous | Next
This symbol external link icon indicates an external link
All images and content are the property of eHistory at The Ohio State University unless otherwise stated.
Copyright © 2014 OSU Department of History. All rights reserved. [citation and copyright information]
eHistory icon