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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 485 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

are commenced for the abandonment of navy-yard and removal of public property both from Norfolk and Peninsula. Your announcement to-day that you will withdraw to-morrow takes us by surprise, and must involve enormous losses, including unfinished gunboats. Will the safety of your army allow more time?

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

RICHMOND, VA., May 1, 1862.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON, Yorktown, Va.:

It is a necessity that you should send General Smith or General Longstreet to the Army of the North. I dislike to tax you at this time, but it is unavoidable, and admits of no delay.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

RICHMOND, VA., May 1, 1862.

Major-General HUGER, Norfolk, Va.:

Send as speedily as possible the railroad iron warehoused at Norfolk and Portsmouth to Raleigh and to Danville via Petersburg. Use both roads, and detail Mr. John M. Robinson, who is at Suffolk, on General Loring's staff, to take charge of the transportation on his road, and request General Mahone to order his superintendent to take charge of that on the Norfolk and Petersburg road. Lose no time, as much more is involved than the railroad iron, and it is of great importance to have the roads clear for other purposes.

G. W. RANDOLPH,

Secretary of War.


HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., May 1, 1862.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,
Commanding,&c., Yorktown, Va.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 29th, relative to the supposed plans of General McClellan and their result upon your movements, as well as that of the 30th, has been received and submitted to the President. The feasibility of the proposition contained in the latter has been the subject of consideration with him for some time, so far as advancing a column to the Potomac with all the troops that can be made available. The proposed invasion of Ohio by General Beauregard, however desirable, it is feared at this time is impracticable, though it will also be considered. He concurs in your views as to the benefits to be obtained by taking the offensive, and is very desirous of being able to carry it into effect.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.


HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., May 1, 1862.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding Army of the Peninsula:

GENERAL: An important defensive work is to be constructed on


Page 485 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
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