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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 377 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

&c., must on any consideration be allowed to delay the wagons in the rear of the one specially affected. An escort must be left with it and the train must move on.

9. Quartermaster will see that their animals are well watered before starting out.

No stoppage must be made for the purpose of watering while on the road.

Wagon wheels will not be locked for the descent of hills, except where it cannot be avoided without danger.

10. To each brigade train the brigade commander will assign a guard of companies amounting to 100 men. No other men will be permitted to go with the wagons. These companies will permit no stragglers of any command whatever to join the train, compelling all such to join their own regiments or march as prisoners and assist the guard in giving aid to the wagons. The officers will exercise their cool judgment and energy to expedite the march and not wait to be asked for assistance.

11. Commanders of corps, divisions, brigades, regiments, companies, and guards will take the necessary steps to prevent straggling, and punish, on arrival in camp, all offenders. Men must not be permitted to leave the ranks. At the end of every hour on the march there will be a rest of five minutes, and the men must avail themselves of these intervals to re-arrange belts, obey the calls of nature, &c.

12. The hour of marching, the route, and the place of encampment will be specially communicated to each corps commander.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HARRISON'S LANDING, August 15, 1862.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General:

Your dispatch of the 13th is just received. We have embarked troops from this point to the full extent of our ability. Colonel Falls and others will tell you so. When we reach Yorktown and Fort Monroe the army will be sent off rapidly. Up to this moment the thing could not have been done faster. I believe I comprehend the whole question. I have the will to execute your orders, and shall be ably assisted by Captain Sawtelle and our other officers and agents. The movement to the rear has commenced. This river will be clear of vessels early tomorrow. Captain Sawtelle will go by water in charge of the fleet and to make arrangements for embarkation at Yorktown, Newport News, and Fort Monroe. I shall go by land to conduct the trains, &c. Rely upon us, general. There shall be no unsatisfactory delay that we can avoid in the quartermaster's department. The vessels sent to us should assemble at Fort Monroe.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Aide-de-Camp, and Chief Quartermaster.

HAXALL'S, August 15, 1862-1.30 p.m.

General R. B. MARCY,

Chief of Staff:

General: Yesterday a free negro living near Malvern came in and told me that the enemy had obstructed all the roads near the river


Page 377 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
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