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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 223 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

enemy could be done, and General Wool, on being consulted, most decidedly agreed with me in opinion that in view of a possible reverse at Richmond they should be destroyed. Accordingly the casemates, magazines, and bomb-proofs at Pig Point, Sewell's Point, Craney Island, and Penner's Point, together with the log huts at each of these places, have been blown up and burned, but the parapets and embrasures as a general thing still remain, and it is not my purpose to disturb them further unless ordered to do so. In a day or two I shall ship to Washington fourteen Dahlgrens, 9-inch guns, one 10-inch, one 11-inch, and three heavy 9-pounders, with their carriages, all belonging to our Navy. The 8-inch guns and the 32-pounders worth saving I propose to send to the navy-yard, unless the Department wishes me to do otherwise. The 32-pounder rifled by the enemy I have had destroyed, and also some old 32-pounders and carronades. Removing the guns in many cases is a very laborious and tedious job. The weather here of late, having been much against us, rendered the roads very difficult of use. I congratulate the Department upon the glorious success of Captain Davis.

L. M. GOLDSBOROUGH,

Flag-Officer.

McCLELLAN'S, June 10, 1862. (Received 3.30 p.m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

All quiet this morning. Considerable artillery firing yesterday. No one injured on our side. During the night it commenced to rain heavily, and has not yet ceased. The ground in such condition that artillery cannot be moved over the fields. I hope soon the see the first of McCall's division.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, June 10, 1862.

Major-General McCLELLAN:

You probably have observed by the papers that Du Pont is operating against Charleston through Stono Creek. Hunter's force is small, and may not be sufficient to take Fort Johnston, on James Island. But Mr. Fox says that Fort Johnston is the key of the position, and, if taken, Charleston must follow. Stono is in our possession. McCall has left Fredericksburg, and is on the way to join you with his force. Have you instructed him where he shall land?

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

McCLELLAN'S, June 11, 1862-8 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

McCall's troops have commenced arriving at White House. I have sent instructions. Weather good to-day. Glad to hear of Commodore Du Pont's and Hunter's progress. Give me a little good weather and I shall have progress to report here.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General.


Page 223 Chapter XXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 3 (Peninsular Campaign)
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