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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 2 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 567 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.

of two regiments on the right of my line, which was near our center, and some of the Texas skirmishers, had nothing to do with the battle except to suffer a murderous artillery fire, which they did unflinchingly. Personally assisted by my staff, I was called upon to direct the artillery fire, which I continued to do during the afternoon. From my point of view the enemy appeared to fight with great stubbornness, and our attack to have made but little impression upon him. He deployed at one time six batteries in front of our center, when, opening in this deployment with artillery, they, together with the stationary batteries already in position, and which we had been engaging at times during the day, all opened a terrific fire upon Poindexter's field. Our gunners replied with spirit, but from want of ammunition the contest was too unequal, and I caused them successively to withdraw. This cross-fire was excessively severe upon the supporting troops. Toward night, learning that the center was pressed hard, I received orders to direct General Trimble to move over from the left to that point, and commenced to close my own troops into the right, when night fell, and with it the battle, which had raged with great fury, ceased. For an hour after night-fall the enemy shelled the woods and Poindexter's field with rapid and heavy fire. This indicated another withdrawal. My troops remained in position all night, the advanced scouts confirming the withdrawal of the enemy during the night, leaving their dead and wounded.

Of affairs on our center and right I can give no account. My list of casualties is almost entirely from the artillery fire of the enemy, for scarcely a musket was fired in the division. When the immense amount of their artillery is considered, the violence and duration of their fire, and the exposed position of the troops, the loss, thanks to God, may be regarded as small, while the courage and unflinching endurance of the troops are worthy of the highest praise.

The following is the list of killed and wounded:

Command Killed Wounded Missing

THIRD BRIGADE. 6th - 64 -

North Carolina

4th Alabama 2 13 -

2nd Mississippi 1 10 -

11th Mississippi 1 20 -

Reilly's battery - 12 -

Total 4 119 -

Aggregate - - 123

THIRD BRIGADE. 5th 2 9 1

Texas

4th Texas - 2 -

1st Texas 3 20 -

18th Georgia 1 14 -

Total 6 45 1

Aggregate - - 52

Hampton's brigade - - 19

[Third Brigade,

Jackson's division]

Grand aggregate - -

194

I regret that I do not know the names of the different commanders


Page 567 Chapter XXIII. SEVEN-DAYS' BATTLES.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 2 (Peninsular Campaign)
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