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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 1 (Peninsular Campaign)
Page 271 Chapter XXIII. GENERAL REPORTS.

four on and near New Brigde road, 5 miles from Richmond; two near Mrs. Price's and Dr. Garnett's, on Chickahominy Bluff; one on Charles City road; one at Ball's Bluff, and one at Fort Darling; one on Nine-mile road, and other similar breastworks and rifle-pits in the vicinity of the front line of the rebel army of the Chickahominy.

GENERAL ESTIMATES OF THE REBEL FORCES IN VIRGINIA.

Jackson's army of the valley was 15,000 prior to recent re-enforcements from Richmond.

Rebels had opposed to us at the Seven-days' Battles 100,000 men, and estimated our force at 70,000.

One hundred and twenty-five thousand men said to have followed our army on its retreat.

Jackson's valley force was 8,000 to 10,000 men; was re-enforced by Ewell with 10,000 from the Rappahannock, making it 18,000 to 20,000.

Twelve thousand to 15,000 men were sent from Richmond to re-enforce Jackson, but did not reach him until he was on his way to Richmond from the Shenandoah Valley.

Jackson's force now consists of Ewell's division, about 12,000 men G. W. Smith's division, about 12,000 to 15,000 men; Jackson's own division, about 8,000 to 10,000 men.

The whole Richmond army now (July 10) numbers probably 200,000 men, and has been estimated at 250,000.

Georgia regiments recently filled by recruiting to 1,100 or 1,200.

Said to be 20,000 to 25,000 troops at Petersburg. Troops from Beauregard's army are daily arriving.

Heard a rebel lieutenant say that the rebel army numbered 190,000; our army generally estimated by the rebels at 130,000.

Surgeon Powell, returned Union prisoner, states that the admitted rebel loss in the Seven-days' Battles was 19,000.

A British subject who arrived per flag of truce, and is a compositor by trade, states that he set up for the Richmond Examiner an item stating that of 14,000 men led into the second day's fight by General A. P. Hill he only brought out 6,000.

Rebel troops in the Seven-days' Battles, including Jackson's whole force, estimated at 220,000 to 260,000.

Jackson's forces going north are usually estimated at 50,000 but the estimates range from 30,000 to 80,000.

It is customary at the South, in speaking of regiments, to call them thousands, but the regiments will not average over 700.

Jackson was said to have taken with him into the valley one hundred regiments.

Rebel army previous to the late battles was estimated at 250,000, killed and wounded, 45,000 to 50,000.

About 20,000 troops are in the vicinity of Petersburg. About July 5, 50,000 were encamped between Petersburg and Richmond.

That about two weeks ago 25,000 troops were received from the South per Petersburg Railroad, said to have come from Charleston, S. C.

Jackson said to have taken 40,000 troops with him to the valley.

Rebel killed and wounded in the late battles estimated at 25,000 to 75,000.

Jackson said to have with him in the valley 60,000 men.

Rebel army of Richmond estimated at 130,000, exclusive of Jackson's forces and the troops south of James River.

Jackson's estimated at 110,000, of which number 30,000 were recently


Page 271 Chapter XXIII. GENERAL REPORTS.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 11, Part 1 (Peninsular Campaign)
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