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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 5, Part 1 (West Virginia)
Page 790 OPERATIONS IN MD., N. VA., AND W. VA. Chapter XIV.

I will not apologize for troubling you with any matter which seems to me to demand prompt action.

Very truly, your friend and obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON.


Numbers 11.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE KANAWHA,

On the march, forty miles west of Lewisburg, Va.,

August 16, 1861. .

General HENRY A. WISE:

SIR: I understand that an order has been issued by you, requiring the officers of your Legion to communicate with me through you. Such an order can result in nothing but the most serious embarrassment, as your headquarters are 40 miles from my position and that of some of your officers co-operating with me. You will see, therefore, the necessity of revoking immediately that order, if such a one has been issued.

I hope you will hurry up all your available force to my support. I shall in all human probability stand in great need of them almost immediately. I learned from a source deemed worthy of full credit that a large force of the enemy has crossed Gauley, and are advancing by this road. Two hundred of their wagons have been counted this side of Gauley. There is the utmost need for promptness and speed in sending your forces to my support.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Brigadier General, Commanding Forces in the Valley of the Kanawha.


HEADQUARTERS, Manassas, August 17, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT:

Mr. PRESIDENT: I took the liberty yesterday to trouble you on the subject of our commissariat, and now beg leave to add a few words to what was then written.

There is rarely in store here a stock of provisions sufficient to make us feel secure - never enough for an expedition either to the Potomac or to the Bluee Ridge. The latter may, indeed probably will, be necessary; for it seems to me unlikely that McClellan will follow General Scott's plans. We ought, therefore, to have always here stores for twelve or fifteen days at least. We have now for two - if the flour arrived which was expected to-day.

While in the valley, depending upon a commissary quite new to the service, we had always abundance of those portions of the ration which are not imported.

I am sure that if bacon could be issued four times a week instead of twice, our Southern troops would be more contented and far healthier. The last consideration is fast increasing in importance. On my last morning report the total present is 18,178; the sick amount to 4,809.

Let me beg you to glance at the inclosed papers.

With high respect, your obedient servant,
J. E. JOHNSTON.


HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., August 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General CARSON,

Commanding Virginia Militia, Winchester, Va.:

SIR: At the earnest request of several citizens of Hardy County the governor of the State has been induced to recommend that the militia.


Page 790 OPERATIONS IN MD., N. VA., AND W. VA. Chapter XIV.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 5, Part 1 (West Virginia)
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