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The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

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OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 2, Part 1 (First Manassas Campaign)
Page 478 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.

energy. Major Rhett, assistant adjutant-general, who joined me only the day before, was of great service. I left him at Manassas, and to his experience and energy I intrusted the care of ordering my troops to the field of battle as they should arrive, and forwarding ammunition for the artillery during the action. Capts. C. M. Fauntleroy, C. S. Navy, T. L. Preston, assistant adjutant-general, and Lieutenant J. B. Washington, aide-de-camp, conveyed my orders bravely and well on this their first field, as did several gallant gentlemen who volunteered their services-Colonel Cole, of Florida; Major Deas, of Alabama; Colonel Duncan, of Kentucky. Lieutenant Beverly Randolph, C. S. Army, aided Colonel F. J. Thomas in the command of the body of troops he led into action and fought with gallantry. With these was my gallant friend Captain Barfought with gallantry. With these was my gallant friend Captain Barlow Mason, who was mortally wounded. I have already mentioned the brave death of my ordnance officer, Colonel F. J. Thomas. I was much indebted also to Cols. J. S. Preston, Manning, Miles, and Chisolm, and Captain Stevens, of the Engineer Corps, members of General Beauregard's staff, who kindly proffered their services and rendered efficient and valuable aid at different times during the day. Colonel G. W. Lay, of General Bonham's staff, delivered the instructions to the troops sent in pursuit and to intercept the enemy, with much intelligence and courage.

It will be remarked that the three brigadier-generals of the Army of the Shenandoah were all wounded. I have already mentioned the wound of General Smith. General Jackson, though painfully wounded early in the day, commanded his brigade until the close of the action. General Bee, after great exposure at the commencement of the engagement, was mortally wounded just as our re-enforcements were coming up.

The apparent firmness of the U. S. troops at Centreville, who had not been engaged, which checked our pursuit; the strong forces occupying the works near Georgetown, Arlington, and Alexandria; the certainty, too, that General Patterson, if needed, would reach Washington with his army of thirty thousand men sooner than we could, and the condition and inadequate means of the Army of advancing against the capital. It is certain that the fresh troops within the works were in number quite sufficient for their defense. If not, General Patterson's army would certainly re-enforce them soon enough.

This report will be presented to you by my aide-de-camp, Lieutenant J. B. Washington, by whom, and by General Beauregard's aide, Lieutenant Ferguson, the captured colors are transmitted to the War Department.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON, General.

The ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL, C. S. Army.

[Indorsement.]

The telegram referred to by General Johnston in this report as received by him "about 1 o'clock on the morning of the 18th July" is inaccurately reported. The following is a copy:

RICHMOND, July 17, 1861.

General J. E. JOHNSTON, Winchester, Va.:

General Beauregard is attacked. To strike the enemy a decisive blow a junction of all your effective force will be needed. If practicable, make the movement, sending your sick and baggage to Culpeper Court-House either by railroad or by Warrenton. In all the arrangements exercise your discretion.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.


Page 478 OPERATIONS IN MD., PA., VA., AND W. VA. Chapter IX.
OFFICIAL RECORDS: Series 1, vol 2, Part 1 (First Manassas Campaign)
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