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  Page 24 (Further Readings )

 

Further Readings

 

Several of the volumes of the U.S. Army in World War II series are critical in examining the Rhineland Campaign. Forrest C. Pogue, The Supreme Command (1954), provides an excellent general overview of the campaign's operations and a thorough account of the coalition issues faced by General Eisenhower. Charles B. MacDonald, The Siegfried Line Campaign (1963), provides an in-depth look at the operations of the First Army from the West Wall to the Roer River, as well as an analysis of Operation MARKET-GARDEN. Charles B. MacDonald and Sidney T. Mathews, Three Battles: Arnaville, Altuzzo, and Schmidt (1952), contains a compelling examination of the ordeal of the 28th Infantry Division in the Huertgen Forest. Hugh M. Cole, The Lorraine Campaign (1950), recounts operations of the Third Army from September 1944 through mid-December 1944. Jeffrey J. Clarke and Robert Ross Smith, Riviera to the Rhine (1993), provides an insightful appraisal of the operations of the 6th Army Group from the invasion of southern France to mid-February 1945. Charles B. MacDonald, The Last Offensive (1973), examines Allied operations from early January 1945 through the end of the war in Europe. Russell Weigley, Eisenhower's Lieutenants: The Campaign in France and Germany, 1944 45 (1981), is a superb narrative that comments on both operations and the personalities of the principal Allied commanders, while Alfred D. Chandler et al., eds., The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower, The War Years: IV (1970), provides insight into Eisenhower's private and public thoughts about the Rhineland Campaign, documents concerning operations, and useful editorial annotations that put the documents in context and refer the reader to other sources. Finally, Ralph Bennett, ULTRA in the West: The Normandy Campaign of 1944-1945 (1979), analyzes the impact ULTRA intelligence had on Allied operations.

CMH Pub 72-25

 

Page 24 (Further Readings )