War of the Rebellion: Serial 129 Page 0197 CONFEDERATE AUTHORITIES.

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[First indorsement.]

MARCH 12, 1864.

Respectfully submitted to the President for information as to the views of Governor Brown, of Georgia, in relation to the reserve forces.

J. A. S.,

Secretary.

[Second indorsement.]

The law is our guide. Has not the call been made and a term allowed for voluntary organizations?

J. D.

[Third indorsement.]

MARCH 19, 1864.

To Conscript Bureau with the President's inquiry and report for reply.

J. A. S.,

Secretary

[Fourth indorsement.]

BUREAU OF CONSCRIPTION, Richmond, March 24, 1864.

Respectfully returned to the Secretary of War, and attention invited to paragraph XIX of Circular Numbers 8, form this Bureau.

JNO S. PRESTON,

Colonel and Superintendent.

[Inclosure.]

MILLEDGEVILLE, March 1, 1864.

Colonel L. J. GARTRELL:

DEAR SIR: In reply to your letter I state that I can make no statement about the enrollment of men between forty-five and fifty till I know the pleasure of the Legislature soon to assemble. When last in session they passed an act directing me to have enrolled all such for State defense, and I do not know that they will recognize the right of the Confederate Government now to take them all out of the hands of the State. If conscription is legal and constitutional, as our courts hold, for raising armies in the proper sense of that term, it does not follow that Congress is authorized to take into is own hands the internal police regulations of the States and deprive the States of the power to execute their own laws or to suppress internal insurrections.

I am, very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, WAR DEPARTMENT, Richmond, Va., March 5, 1864.

His Excellency Z. B. VANCE,

Governor of North Carolina:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 29th ultimo relative to an apprehended collision between the Confederate and State authorities in the enforcement of the recent law Congress abolishing conscription. You cannot deprecate more a collision of such a character, nor be more anxious to avoid it, than myself, and yet I am unable to perceive how naturally or rightfully, in the enforcement of the law, such collision can occur.