War of the Rebellion: Serial 097 Page 0665 Chapter LVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

April 9, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding U. S. Armies:

GENERAL: I sent a communication to you to-day from the picket-line, whither I had gone in hopes of meeting you in pursuance of the request contained in my letter of yesterday. Major-General Meade informs me that it would probably expedite matters to send a duplicate through some other part of your lines. I therefore request an interview, at such time and place as you may designate, to discuss the terms of the surrender of this army in accordance with your offer to have such an interview, contained in your letter of yesterday.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

April 9, 1865.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding C. S. Army:

Your note of this date is but this moment (11.50 a. m.) received. In consequence of my having passed from the Richmond and Lynchburg road to the Farmville and Lynchburg road I am at this writing about four miles west of Walker's Church, and will push forward to the front for the purpose of meeting you. Notice sent to me on this road where you wish the interview to take place will meet once.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMIES OF THE UNITED STATES,

Appomattox Court-House, Va., April 9, 1865.

General R. E. LEE,

Commanding C. S. Army:

GENERAL: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate-one copy to be given to an officer to be designated by me, the other to be retained by such officer or officers ass you may designate; the officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms again the Government of the United States until properly exchanged, and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands. The arms, artillery, and public property to be parked and stacked, and turned over to the officers appointed by me to receive them. This will not embrace the side-arms of the officers, nor their private horses or baggage. This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.

Very respectfully,

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.