War of the Rebellion: Serial 095 Page 0156 N. AND SE. VA., N. C., W. VA., MD., AND PA. Chapter LVIII.

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as far as the Armstrong house, which includes all but a small portion on the extreme left near Hatcher's Run, which there was no military advantage in retaining. Humphreys now estimates his casualties at 700, Wright at 400, which will make our total casualties from all parts of the line about 2,000. Deserters report the fighting very severe, and the result as having a depressing and demoralizing effect on their army.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 26, 1865 - 10 p. m.

Official returns from the several corps show the casualties of yesterday as follows: Second Corps - killed, 51; wounded, 462; missing, 177. Sixth Corps - killed, 47; wounded, 402; missing, 30. Ninth Corps - killed, 68; wounded, 337; missing, 506. Total - killed, 166; wounded, 1,201; missing, 713; or a grand total of 2,080, which is 80 larger than my approximate estimate of this morning. Of prisoners, the account now stands: Second Corps, 365; Sixth Corps, 365; Sixth Corps, 469; Ninth Corps, 1,949; total, 2,783, or 13 less than reported last night; of this number some 200 are wounded in our hospitals. It has been quiet along the lines to-day. Permission was granted the enemy, on application, to remove their dead and wounded, under flag of truce, both on the Second and Sixth Corps fronts.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

March 26, 1865 - 11.30 p. m.

General Humphreys estimates the enemy's losses in killed and wounded in his front as fully three times his, and I have no doubt from the character of the fighting, the heaviest being repulsing their attacks, that their losses wee very much greater. Wright also thinks they lost much heavier than we did. On Parke's front their losses were quite severe from the artillery fire of adjacent batteries, not only when their supports were moving up but when they were withdrawing. On the whole, I think it would be reasonable to estimate the enemy's losses in killed and wounded as 50 per cent. greater than ours this would make them about 2,000, which added to the prisoners would give 4,800. Taking in stragglers nd deserters, I think if safe to estimate Lee's loss for the day not less than 5,000 men.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

Lieutenant-General GRANT.