War of the Rebellion: Serial 091 Page 0901 Chapter LV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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NEW MARKET, October 20, 1864.

(Via Richmond.)

Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The Sixth and Nineteenth Corps have not left the Valley. I fought them both yesterday. I attacked Sheridan's camp on Cedar Creek before day yesterday morning, and surprised and routed the Eighth and Nineteenth Corps, and then drove the Sixth Corps beyond middle town, capturing 18 pieces of artillery and 1,300 prisoners; but the enemy subsequently made a stand on the pike, and, in turn, attacked my line, and my left gave way, and the rest of the troops took a panic and could not be rallied, retreating in confusion. But for their bad conduct I should have defeated Sheridan's whole force. On the retreat back to Fisher's Hill the enemy capture about thirty pieces of artillery and some wagons and ambulances. The prisoners were brought off. My loss in men was not heavy. General Ramseur was seriously wounded while acting with gallantry, and was captured by the enemy.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.

CHAFFIN'S BLUFF, October 20, 1864.

(Received 21st.)

General JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE:

General Early has met with another reverse and has lost largely in artillery. If you can spare the battery you mentioned, send it to him, as also the troops, without delay.

R. E. LEE.

CHAFFIN'S BLUFF, October 21, 1864.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

Dispatch from General Early just received states that he lost twenty-three pieces of artillery on the 19th. His loss in killed and wounded in the early part of the day was not more than 100. His loss in prisoners not known. Enemy's loss believed to be severe. He has secured over 1,300 prisoners.

R. E. LEE.

NEW MARKET, October 21, 1864.

General R. E. LEE:

My net loss in artillery on the 19th was twenty-three pieces. My loss in killed and wounded is less [than] 1,000. In the early part of the day it was not more than 100. I cannot say how many were captured, but I think very few. Many of the men scattered, and are still coming in. The enemy's infantry is very badly demoralized. My men ran without sufficient cause, and the capture of artillery, &c., was made by the enemy's cavalry. The enemy is not pursuing; his loss was very severe. I have sent off over 1,300 prisoners.

J. A. EARLY,

Lieutenant-General.