War of the Rebellion: Serial 088 Page 1208 OPERATIONS IN SE. VA. AND N. C. Chapter LIV.

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HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY CORPS, August 30, 1864.

Lieutenant Colonel W. H. TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of Northern Virginia:

COLONEL: Having to-day re-examined our lines between the former explosion and the crossing of the plank road beyond Rivers' salient, I desire respectfully to suggest to the commanding general the importance of having constructed, as soon as practicable, a covered way along the rear line of works and guns. Should the enemy spring several mines at different points of the line simultaneously, such rear covered way would be of utmost value in concentrating troops quickly at the critical points. Without it, exposed as is that plain to a severe fire, a considerable detour, involving loss of time and energy, would be necessary in transferring troops from one side to the other. In case of need, too, such channel and embankment might serve well for a second line of defense. General Alexander fully concurs with me in this view, and I have on former occasions understood Colonel Stevens to express like convictions. The troops in position seem to have ass much work to do on the front line as they can well accomplish. Might it not be well for some reserve brigade to effect this within the next night or two under direction of the engineers?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. N. PENDLETON,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

HDQRS. ARTILLERY, ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, August 30, 1864.

Colonel R. L. WALKER,

Chief of artillery, Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia:

COLONEL: Having observed things to-day on the left of your line needing prompt action I communicate them that you may have the requisite steps taken:

First. The 8-inch columbiad is not sufficiently fixed for service; you had better have it pressed on to completion, as there is no saying when it may be needed.

Second. The two 8-inch howitzers are nearly useless where they now are; it is essential that they be otherwise located. One where the

Blakelys were prepared for; one where the two 8-inch columbiads were prepared for. These changes sought to be made immediately. One of your 24-pounder howitzers ought to be also where the 8-inch columbiads were prepared for, in case of a blow-up and assault at Rives' salient. Another of your 24-pounder howitzers ought to be with the other 8-inch howitzer, where the Blakelys were provided for. These preparations on the rear line ought to be accomplished at once, as there is no saying when the enemy will spring the mines he is constructing. Please have these matters attended to immediately.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. N. PENDLETON,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.