War of the Rebellion: Serial 087 Page 0853 Chapter LIV. THE RICHMOND CAMPAIGN.

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CHAFFIN'S BLUFF, October 13, 1864.

At 7 this morning enemy endeavored to advance between the Darbytown and Charles City roads, but was repulsed in every attempt. The most strenuous effort was made about 4 p.m., after which he withdrew, leaving many dead. Our loss very slight. General Breckinridge reports that a force of the enemy came to Greeneville on the 12th, and was defeated by Brigadier-General Vaughn. Some prisoners, two stand of colors, many horses and arms, were captured. The enemy lost many killed and wounded. Our loss slight.

R. E. LEE,

General.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

CHAFFIN'S BLUFF, October 27, 1864.

The movement of the enemy against our left to-day was repulsed. Two attacks upon our lines were made-one between the Henrico Poor-House and Charles City road, the other on the Williamsburg road. Several hundred prisoners and four stand of colors were captured. Our loss very slight. On the 25th Colonel Mosby, near Bunker Hill, captured Brigadier-General Duffie, several other prisoners, a number of horses, and killed a number of the enemy. He sustained no loss.

R. E. LEE,

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

CHAFFIN'S BLUFF, October 27, 1864-11 p.m.

General Hill reports that the enemy crossed Rowanty Creek below Burgess' Mill and forced back the cavalry. In the afternoon General Heth attacked and at first drove them, but found them in too strong force. Afterward the enemy attacked and were repulsed. They still hold the plank road at Burgess' Mill. Heth took colors and some prisoners.

R. E. LEE,

General.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

CHAFFIN'S BLUFF, October 28, 1864.

General Hill reports that the attack of General Heth upon the enemy on the Boydton plank road, mentioned in my dispatch last evening, was made by three brigades under General Mahone in front, and General Hampton in the rear. Mahone captured 400 prisoners 3 stand of colors, and 6 pieces of artillery. The latter could not be brought off, the enemy having possession of the bridge. In the attack subsequently made by the enemy General Mahone broke three miles of battle, and during the night the enemy retired from the Boydton road, leaving his wounded and more than 250 dead on the field. About 9 p.m. a small force assaulted and took possession of our works on the