War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0947 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.- UNION.

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in behalf of the citizens, and asks that some troops be sent there to protect them. I have ordered a detachment of fifteen men to be sent down there to-morrow with fifteen days' rations. Will Pembina and Georgetown be occupied by troops this winter?

Very respectfully, yours, &.,

C. POWELL ADAMS,

Major, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS FORT WADSWORTH, DAK. TER., August 30, 1864.

Captain R. C. OLIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, District of Minnesota:

SIR: Please find inclosed the report of Lieutenant Philips, commanding escort to Captain Fisk's train to the Missouri River. He returned to this post on the 29th instant. Also the report of Lieutenant Gardner, Company M, Second Cavalry,who left this post on the 26th instant with ten men of his company and eleven scouts, in charge of Gabriel Renville. I approved of the course taken by Lieutenant Phillips in regard to his acting as escort to Captain Fisk's train farther than the Missouri River,and would respectfully ask instructions should any similar case arise.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN CLOWNEY,

Major Thirtieth Regiment Wisconsin Vol. Infantry, Commanding

[Inclosure No. 1.]

FORT WADSWORTH, DAK. TER., August 29, 1864.

Major JOHN CLOWNEY,

Commanding Post, Fort Wadsworth:

SIR: I have the honor to submit for your approval the following report of my march from this post to Fort Rice, on the Missouri, also of my return march from that post. I left this post on the 1st day of August, 1864, in pursuance of the following order:

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. GARRISON FOR FORT WADSWORTH, DAK. TER., No. 19.

Camp on Kettle Lake, July 31, 1864.

Captain Bonham, Company I, Second Minnesota Cavalry, will detail one officer and fifty men of his command to escort the emigrant train under command of Captain Fisk to the Missouri River, after which they will report to these headquarters without delay.

By order of Major John Clowney:

THOS. PRIESTLEY,

Lieutenant and Acting Adjutant.

After leaving this post I followed the trail established by your scouts through to the James River, on which stream we camped on the night of the 2nd instant. We found there a camp of about fifteen or twenty Indians with their families. They had a pass signed by General Sully, giving them permission to hunt buffalo along that river. From the James River we took a northwest course, making a new trail north of any of those previously established. On the 6th we crossed a fresh Indian trail leading to the west of us, and on the next day our scouts discovered a camp which had been lately deserted, and where they calculated some 700 or 800 Indians had been lately encamped. On the