War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0897 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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valley are returning to their ranches, and confidence has been restored. Fifty men are now organized in the vicinity of Lupton for defense, and are confident that they are equal to any emergency that may arise. I learned on the scout that the story about Indians being seen and robbing houses was totally without foundation. I suggest the propriety of allowing my command to return to Denver, with the understanding that we may be called out at any moment.

Now, gentlemen, you will at once see how contradictory the case stands. I may add that I have not thirty mounted men at Denver, except Captain Browne and his independent militia company, but I shall have very soon, and you can rest assured that you shall have equal protection with any other part of my district.

I have the honor to be, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. CHIVINGTON,

Colonel First Cavalry of Colorado, Commanding District.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO,

Santa Fe, N. Mex., August 27, 1864.

Brigadier General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor again to call your attention to the condition of this department with reference to its rapidly diminishing force from the mustering out of service now and between this time and next November, of the most of the First Cavalry New Mexico Volunteers, of five companies of the First Cavalry, and the First and Fifth Regiments of Infantry California Volunteers. As you will see, this leaves the department in a helpless condition. The Indians upon the plains are attacking our trains and killing our people. We are in active hostilities with the Apaches of Arizona, and have 7,641 Indian prisoners upon the reservation, which for the present we are obliged to guard. I heard a rumor that it was the intention of the War Department to send Colonel Ford's regiment of Colorado Volunteers for service in this department. If that regiment, now in Missouri, could be sent at once across the plains to New Mexico the moral effect upon the hostile Indians en route would doubtless be so great that they would leave the road and thus let our trains come through in safety. The importance of these trains coming through without molestation, laden as they are with our subsistence stores, hospital stores, and supplies of ordnance and ordnance stores, cannot be too highly estimated. I beg this matter may have the immediate and serious attention of the War Department.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO,

Santa Fe, N. Mex., August 27, 1864.

Brigadier General LORENZO THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have ordered a force of fifty cavalry and fifty infantry, under the command of Major Joseph Updegraff, to the Lower Cimarron Springs to assist in giving

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