War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0857 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--UNION.

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eating dead animals on the road. We must feed them or desperation and starvation will drive them into war. They cannot go and hunt large game, for it is remote, and they fear hostile Indians. They cannot kill small game with bows and arrows. They have no ammunition. They could be fed on corn and bacon. In view of this presentation by Major Wood, I would like to know how the Government regards these Sioux. I hope no ammunition will be issued any of the prairie tribes, for they are all mixed up with those whom we most regard as hostile. I will send food to the starving in small daily issues till I get your instructions, or get evidence of their hostility. I am collecting volunteer militia and friendly Indians to suppress hostile bands and restore the overland stages to safe transmission of mails, but I find the Indians operate so wildly and strangely it is exceedingly difficult. I must take upon myself some responsibility in the way of raising troops and equipments which I hope you will tolerate.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

PLEASANT HILL, MO., August 25, 1864.

Colonel J. H. FORD,

Kansas City:

Corporal Shaw and fourteen men just returned from foot scout. Had a fight about 6 o'clock this morning eight miles east of here; killed 2, wounded several, and crippled several horses. There were not less than sixty bushwhackers. They fought them until the bushwhackers had them surrounded on three sides. Corporal Shaw, thinking there were most too many for him and were dismounting to fight them on foot, succeeded in getting out and have all arrived safely. No one hurt. Paymaster just arrived.

E. P. ELMER,

Captain, Commanding Station.

WESTON, August 25, 1864.

General FISK:

I received reliable information at Liberty yesterday evening that between 300 and 350 guerrillas and bushwhackers crossed the Missouri River on Tuesday night at a point about two miles from Ridgefield. The party came there from all directions and were under the command of Major Thrailkill. This is reliable.

D. J. HYNES,

Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

MEXICO, August 25, 1864.

General FISK:

Captain Carey reports from Columbia that one of his spies just in reports the rebels crossing the river in two flat-boats above Claysville all day the 23rd instant to north side of the river.

J. B. DOUGLASS,

Brigadier-General.