War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0780 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, Numbers 223.

New Orleans, August 20, 1864.

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6. The Bayou Manchac is hereby announced as the boundary line between the District of Baton Rogue and Port Hudson and the Defenses of New Orleans until further orders.

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By command of Major-General Banks:

W. D. PUTNAM,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEFENSES OF NEW ORLEANS, Numbers 27.

New Orleans, August 20, 1864.

Captain Frederic Speed, assistant adjutant-general, having been assigned to duty at these headquarters, will relieve Captain Oliver Matthews, assistant adjutant-general of the Defenses of New Orleans, and all communications for the general commanding will hereafter be directed to him.

T. W. SHERMAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF BATON ROUGE AND PORT HUDSON,

Baton Rouge, La., August 20, 1864.

Brigadier General A. L. LEE,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

There has been great complaint for the past few days from the plantations near our present line of pickets of the conduct of our soldiers, who it seems have been permitted to leave their posts, wandering about at will, and helping themselves without stint to whatever could be found. Many of the plantations in this vicinity are worked by loyal men who have already suffered severely, and it is my desire to protect them from these depredations. The great fault appears to be with the officers in immediate charge of the picket-posts who permit their men to leave their station, and thus countenance this system of plunder. They should be held personally responsible for the conduct of every man at their post, and if not attentive to their duty in watching their men, should be severely punished. I will approve any plan you may adopt for the punishment of either officers or men guilty of this unsoldierly conduct. I am also informed that our pickets frequently pass our own soldiers beyond the lines without any passport or authority whatever. They should have especial instructions in regard to this matter. From this time forward no pass to go beyond the lines will be issued by any one but myself, and these passes will be taken up by the pickets and returned to headquarters each day. You will find the great trouble with the regiments forming this division to be their lawlessness, which is accounted of by their not having served in any brigade or division organization for the past few months. It will require severe measures to bring them down, but you can do it,and the sooner a commencement is made the better. I would recommend