War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0763 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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By General Sykes's order I sent one of the operators here to Paola by this morning's stage. The scare at Paola has passed over. General McKean renews his application for leave of absence. General Sykes has gone into the country and General Davies to Atchison. Mayor McDowell complaints of Mathews and Major McKenny has investigated. Over forty stepped out as having been forced into the ranks. Colonel Chivington telegraphs that they and corn contractors ought to be awarded to some one immediately. Indian difficulties increasing.

C. S. CHARLOT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 18, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS,

Omaha, Nebr. Ter.:

News from Blunt to the 15th. Indian outrages continue. He asks for Captain Mobley's company, Seventeenth Kansas. Shall I send McKean a mounted cavalry, in view of Captain Conkey's withdrawing from Fort Scott? A. C. Wilder is going to Washington in a few days and urges you to ask the War Department for authority for you to raise a cavalry regiment. It can be raised at once from the Fifth, Sixth, and Tenth Kansas, now here being mustered out. He wants you to make the military argument and he is confident of success.

C. S. CHARLOT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

OMAHA, August 18, 1864.

Major S. S. CURTIS:

I want the Ohio troops going to Colorado. My advance moves to-day. I go forward on telegraph line to-morrow. All well. How are matters at headquarters?

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 18, 1864.

Major-General CURTIS,

Omaha, Nebr. Ter.:

The Ohio troops left last Monday morning for Fort Kearny. All well and all right here.

S. S. CURTIS,

Major and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTH KANSAS,

Paola, August 18, 1864.

Major S. C. CHARLOT,

Asst. Adjt. General, Dept. of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

MAJOR: I beg leave respectfully to call the attention of the major-general commanding the department to the fact that it is probable that I shall be without telegraphic communication from this point after to-day. Mr. D. Byington, the assistant superintendent of military telegraph at Leavenworth, seems to insist that the operator here shall