War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0662 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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shrewd, reticent officer with ten picket men to live at their village for sixty days, and learn what he can of what they have done in this regard and to observe what they are doing. He will keep his own counsel.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO,

Santa Fe, N. Mex., August 11, 1864.

Colonel GEORGE W. BOWIE,

Commanding District of Arizona, Franklin, Tex.:

COLONEL: I have heard unofficially that one Sylvester Mowry, a traitor to his country, is about to come to Arizona within the limits of this department. You will at once give orders to the commanders of your different posts to have this Mowry arrested and kept securely confined in the guard-house, until such time as an opportunity may present for so doing, when he will be sent as a prisoner to Fort Yuma, Cal., and there turned loose, with orders not again to come within the boundaries of this department. He will be arrested the moment he arrives in Arizona. Let this be done effectually. I will tolerate this villain's presence within my command.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, August 11 1864-1.30 p.m.

Major General JOHN POPE:

General Grant has ordered the First Regiment U. S. Volunteers, over 1,000 strong, composed of refugees and deserters from the rebel States, to your department for duty. The detachment of the First Connecticut Cavalry can be assigned for duty with this regiment and be so mustered and paid. General Grant directs that all the troops that can possibly be spared from your department be sent to General Sherman in Georgia, in anticipation of the arrival of this regiment.

H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff.

OFFICE COMMISSARY OF SUBSISTENCE,

Saint Cloud, Minn., August 11, 1864.

Brigadier General H. H. SIBLEY:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I presume you have heard rumors of anticipated difficulty with the Chippewas. A reliable gentleman from Fort Ripley informs me that las week three chiefs from the Red Lake Indians visited the post and gave the information that Hole-in-the-Day had sent tobacco tied with red tape to nearly all the chiefs, being desirous of engaging with them in a raid on the whites. The information is direct, minute, and doubtless reliable. It is not probable that