War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0644 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 10, 1864.

COMMANDING OFFICER,

Fort Kearny, Nebr. Ter.:

Indians are reported murdering citizens on Little Blue. If your force is sufficient come down on them.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

OMAHA, NEBR. TER., August 10, 1864.

POST COMMANDANT,

Fort Kearny:

Act upon the dispatches sent to Colonel Summers. I have given transportation to Government Saunders for territorial arms and ammunition to Kearny. Are you in communication with General Mitchell? Do you know where he is?

JNO. PRATT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

DENVER, COLO., August 10, 1864.

(Received 3.05 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

The alliance of Indians on the plains reported last winter in my communication is now undoubted. A large force, say 10,000 troops, will be necessary to defend the lines and put down hostilities. Unless they can be sent at once we will be cut off and destroyed.

JOHN EVANS,

Governor of Colorado Territory.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Denver City, Colo., August 10, 1864. (Received 9 p. m.)

Honorable W. P. DOLE,

Commissioner of Indian, Affairs:

I am now satisfied that the tribes of the plains are nearly all combined in this terrible war, as apprehended last winter. It will be the largest Indian war this country ever had, extending from Texas to the British lines, involving nearly all the wild tribes of the plains. Please bring all the force of your department to bear in favor of speedy re-enforcements of our troops, and get me authority to raise a regiment of 100-days' mounted men. Our militia law is inoperative, and unless this authority is given we will be destroyed.

JOHN EVANS,

Governor of Colorado Territory and Superintendent of Indians.

HEADQUARTERS FORT WADSWORTH, DAK. TER.,

August 10, 1864.

Captain R. C. OLIN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, District of Minnesota:

SIR: On the 4th instant I made a personal examination of the timber on the different coulees in this vicinity, returning by way of Buffalo Lake to ascertain the amount of grass that might be obtained, whether sufficient to furnish hay for the use of the animals to be kept at this