War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0625 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Denny, of Huntsville, with part of the Ninth Cavalry Missouri State Militia, and Randolph Enrolled Missouri Militia, had a fight Sunday evening near Huntsville with Jim Anderson (a brother of Bill); killed 1 of his men, wounded 1 or 2; captured 5 revolvers, several guns, and 2 horses. I have this day ordered Companies A and D, Ninth Cavalry Missouri State Militia, to move from Allen to Fayette and report to Major Leonard for orders. I will replace these troops thus taken from Allen by troops for the time being from Major Bartlett's command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. DOUGLASS,

Brigadier-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 9, 1864.

Captain BRACKMAN,

Macon City, Mo.:

Troops have been concentrated and are operating successfully in Saline County. Is not Colonel Draper at Macon City? If so, your communications in future will come though him.

O. D. GREENE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

PAOLA, August 9, 1864.

Brigadier-General McKEAN:

The following dispatch has just been received from department headquarters:

FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 9, 1864.

Brigadier General T. J. McKEAN:

To-day's dispatches speak of an attack on Fort Smith and rebel troops at Bentonville Ark. Let scouts be sent out from Fort Scott and look in that direction for trouble.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

GEO. S. HAMPTON.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF UPPER ARKANSAS,

Fort Riley, Kans., August 9, 1864.

Captain J. H. DODGE,

Ninth Wisconsin Battery:

I am in receipt of your letter of the 8th instant, inclosing letter of Captain Mossman to General S. N. Wood relative to recent movements of the Pottawatomie and Kickapoo Indians. A few days since I received the same information through another channel, and from all the facts I have been able to gather I am inclined to the opinion that there is a conspiracy between the hostile Indians of the plains and rebel emissaries acting as the agents of the Confederate Government. No armed Indians should be allowed to leave the settlements for the plains through their head men or agents. They should be made to understand the difficulty now existing between the Government authorities and the Indians on the Western border, and warned not to involve themselves in acts of hostility which these movements west in armed bodies at this time would inevitably lead to. At all events, they should be pro-

40 R R-VOL XLI, PT II