War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0486 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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safely through the region but recently infested by the outlaws of the Sioux Nation without finding a trace of their presence, proving that they have been forced to seek out other localities more remote from civilization wherein to practice their barbarous customs and eke out their miserable existence.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. HUBBELL.

THIBODEAUX, July 31, 1864.

Captain MATTHEWS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Colonel Davis reached Brule last night without finding the enemy. Here he divided his command and sent one portion to Gentilly's plantation, on Natchez Bay, and will go above with the other toward Indian Village. I think it probable the party he is pursuing are simply rebel horse-thieves, and will elude him.

R. A. CAMERON,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

THIBODEAUX, July 31, 1864.

(Received 11 p. m.)

Major DRAKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Colonel Davis has returned without finding the enemy. It appears to have been a party recruiting horses.

R. A. CAMERON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. July 31, 1864.

(Received 1.45 a. m. August 1.)

His Excellency A. LINCOLN,

President:

I have frequently recommended the promotion of Colonel Powell Clayton, Fifth Kansas Cavalry, to brigadier-general. I address you direct because he will soon go out of service by expiration of term unless promoted. If he goes out it will be to the great detriment of the service. As an executive cavalry officer I know of no one in the service superior to him. It would cripple me to lose him. Official reports show what he has done. There is but one opinion in this army and in this State in regard to his merits.

I have the honor to be, yours, &c.,

F. STEELE,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF LITTLE ROCK, Numbers 55.

July 31, 1864.

I. The commanding officer of the Third Cavalry Brigade, Second Division, will detail permanent guards of from fifty to seventy-five men each for the hay contractors, L. O. Hemingway and G. M. Jones, and a proportionate number for Miller and George. the men comprising