War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0348 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLORADO TERRITORY,

Denver, July 22, 1864.

Colonel J. M. CHIVINGTON:

DEAR SIR: I have reliable information that the settlements on the Purgatoire River are much exposed to Indian depredations and apprehensive of difficulty from the Ute Indians, who are said to be much dissatisfied. If practicable you will please station a force at such place as may be proper to render the protection asked for. This will be handed to headquarters by Mr. Walker, deputy U. S. marshal, who will explain more fully the necessity of this case.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. EVANS,

Governor of Colorado Territory.

HDQRS. DIST. OF MINNESOTA, DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Saint Paul, Minn., July 22, 1864.

Major General JOHN POPE,

Commanding Department of the Northwest, Milwaukee, Wis.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have official dispatches from Major Clowney, commanding detachment to build and garrison Fort Wadsworth, of 14th instant, when his command with the train had reached a point nearly opposite the mouth of the Chippewa River, and was making good progress. Everything was progressing favorably, both men and animals being in fine condition. No other signs of Indians have been discovered than the trail of a single horseman, supposed to be a scout. Major Clowney, in compliance with my directions, was taking every precaution against surprise. The column from this district, styled the Minnesota Brigade, reached the neighborhood of Swan Lake, the designated point of junction with General Sully's command on the Missouri, on 30th ultimo, twenty-four hours after the general's arrival, having marched by pedometer measurement 332 miles from Fort Ridgely. Colonel Thomas reports the command in admirable order, the animals having improved rather than deteriorated by the march. The Indians to the number of 1,800 lodges were reported to be on the west of the Missouri, five days' march distant from General Sully's camp. Ex-Lieutenant Colonel C. P. Adams, of the First Minnesota Volunteers, a fine officer and strict disciplinarian, has been appointed successor to Major Hatch in the command of the Independent Battalion.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Bayfield, Wis., July 22, 1864.

Major J. F. MELINE,

Act. Asst. Adjt. General, Dept. of the Northwest, Milwaukee:

MAJOR: After a series of unavoidable delays and detentions I have the honor to report my arrival at this place on the 16th instant, and up to this time, from frequent rain-storms and unusually inclement weather