War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0323 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

In the Field, Lawrence, July 21, 1864.

General T. J. McKEAN,

Paola, Kans.:

Generals Rosecrans and Fisk are evidently alarmed. I see nothing new. The Paw Paws are gone to the brush, and we expected that. Be ready if they return after Ford's complete rout of them.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

In the Field, Lawrence, July 21, 1864.

General T. A. DAVIES,

Fort Leavenworth:

Generals Rosecrans and Fisk telegraph for arms. If new troubles arise we must be ready to give them arms, but I prefer that loyal Kansas men should carry them. Therefore help to encourage militia organizations in your district, and if danger again threatens let the militia be actually called and armed as prescribed by the Secretary of War for arming militia in actual service.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, July 21, 1864.

Captain G. J. WEAVER,

Atchison:

General Fisk has no authority to take any one in Atchison. If he catches them in Missouri he may perhaps have claims on them which would hold them.

S. S. CURTIS,

Aide-de-Camp.

JUNCTION RANCH, July 21, 1864.

Lieutenant J. S. MAYNARD,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, District of Colorado:

SIR: I arrived at this point last night from Beaver Creek, where I had been with a detachment of my company. I found Lieutenant Chase here. He had succeeded in taking back most of the stock taken from Bijou Ranch and along the river, and drove them in. The Indians followed them and came in and killed most of the cattle belonging to Mr. Murray and then dashed down on a train and killed one man named Simon Gouldsberry. There were about 100 Indians in the party doing this mischief. We have here now fifty effective men, and our horses are nearly fagged out, having traveled about 150 miles in thirty-six hours. A few days will put most of them in traveling condition, however. I shall remain on the Platte River and try and have a fight with the Indians, or at least stop their thieving.

I am, sir, with respect, your obedient servant,

GEO. L. SANBORN,

Captain, First Cavalry of Colorado.