War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0238 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Saint Louis, July 22, 1864.

Colonel J. P. SANDERSON,

Provost-Marshal-General, Department of the Missouri:

COLONEL: I find that I misapprehended Order 114. I read it hastily at the time it appeared in the papers, and supposed because the captains of the Missouri River boats had to come to our office for permits to purchase arms to comply with the order, I got the idea that the order was to be enforced by you.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. A. KEYSER,

Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Saint Louis, Mo., July 22, 1864.

Respectfully referred to the general commanding with this explanation:

The action of Captain Keyser, who usually is a careful and cautious officer, misapprehended the order of the general commanding, and hence exercised an authority not authorized. He informs me that he knows the parties to be undoubtedly loyal and reliable, and that there need be no apprehension of any improper act knowingly being done by them.

J. P. SANDERSON,

Provost-Marshal-General.

NEW MADRID, July 18, 1864.

Brigadier-General EWING,

Saint Louis:

Newsum & Co. and Howell, Caruts & Co., of this place, have goods on the wharf-boat here which were shipped on permit from you and have been detained about six weeks by order of Captain Mitchell, of the gun-boat Huntress. Shall I respect his authority or not?

JOHN T. BURRIS.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, July 18, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded.

I have instructed Lieutenant-Colonel Burris that Captain Mitchell has no right to interfere with shipments permitted by me, and not to recognize his assumed authority. This interference has been frequent, and I telegraphed some weeks ago to Rear-Admiral D. D. Porter requesting him to put a stop to it. As that request has proved ineffectual I suggest that the major-general commanding telegraph him on the subject.

THOMAS EWING, JR.,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.