War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0123 Chapter LIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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DEVALL'S BLUFF, ARK., July 11, 1864.

Captain C. H. DYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The following report has been received from Captain J. C. Potts, commanding detachment of First Nebraska Cavalry, at Ashley's Station, Ark., this p. m.:

HEADQUARTERS DETACHMENT FIRST NEBRASKA CAVALRY,

Camp near Ashley's Station, Ark., July 11, 1864.

Captain H. C. FILLEBROWN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Devall's Bluff:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that I arrived here at 2.30 p. m. The escort with artillery horses arrived several hours sooner than I did. My camp is in the skirts of the timber two miles and a half west of Ashley's Station. I ordered Lieutenant Lowry to bring all the camp and garrison equipage to-morrow by railroad. How often do you wish reports from my command?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. POTTS,

Captain, Commanding Detachment First Nebraska Cavalry.

Very respectfully,

H. C. FILLEBROWN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

LEWISBURG, July 11, 1864.

Captain C. H. DYER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Little Rock:

Lieutenant Treadway in from scout to Devil's Fork, Red River; killed Captain Christopher and one man. Shelby still east of White River. Ninth Kansas camps to-night ten miles below here.

A. H. RYAN,

Colonel, &c.

HEADQUARTERS INDIAN BRIGADE,

Fort Gibson, C. N. July 11, 1864.

Major General FREDERICK STEELE,

Commanding Department of Arkansas, &c., Little Rock, Ark.:

SIR: I inclose copies* of two telegrams sent from General Halleck. There appears to be some misunderstanding as to purpose. I desire to be instructed definitely and to procure the horses or ponies early of possible. Some time before the change of the departments, applications had been made to mount one or more of the regiments. The first telegram was the response. I have sent three times to you without getting any response, and have been endeavoring to get 1,000 men mounted before the summer passed away. When the Indiana regiments entered the service they were mainly mounted on their own horses and pony horses. For these they were not paid, but they were shod and foraged under orders received. Two years' hard service has completely worn them out. We now have none, and as I have no cavalry, I have to borrow and hire horses even for scouting purposes, and here it is almost

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* Not found as inclosures; but on June 29, 1864, Phillips was informed by Halleck that "the purchase and supply of cavalry horses are made by officers of the Cavalry Bureau."

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