War of the Rebellion: Serial 084 Page 0086 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LIII.

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me know if we cannot concert a movement that will work out these guerrillas. Do you want me to telegraph the adjutant-general about the effect of your order on your State rank? It cannot be you are wanted on duty in the inspector-general's department. They have Marcy and Sackett already.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, July 8, 1864.

Brigadier General E. B. BROWN,

Warrensburg, Mo.:

General Curtis reports from Fort Scott 200 recruits under Taylor and Marchbanks scattered on Clear Creek. Parkville was taken yesterday by the bushwhackers. We must quietly and thoroughly prepare for movement. Hasten action on order 107, and keep me posted as to results.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, July 8, 1864.

General E. B. BROWN,

Warrensburg, Mo.:

Your unofficial letter received. I will try to arrange to get your request in ten days. General Totten has been ordered to duty out of this department. Please give a vigorous attention to the manner in which local commanders presume to order the citizen guards on picket and other guard while our own troops sleep. It will require the good will and vigilance of all officers to prevent abuse and injustice. Rich people stay at home, having paid out, while poor Unionists, who can ill afford to lose time, which is their income, have to serve without pay. Use your utmost endeavor to prevent this hardship.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., July 8, 1864.

In accordance with the order of the general commanding Department of the Missouri, the following dispositions for the quieting of the State of Missouri are respectfully submitted:

To arrive at the present state of the condition of affairs this day in Missouri it will become necessary to partially review its history. Three years ago Missouri, as a slave State, with interests and social relations identified with the other Southern States, its sympathies deeply imbued with the institutions of slavery, was to an extraordinary degree involved in the incipient stages of the present great rebellion. The masses of the people, although loyal to the Government of our forefathers, were torn by conflicting commotions, which for a time seemed to ported a complete destruction of the national authority therein. The enemies to the public peace sought by every means to inflame and alight up the fires of the baser passions of the multitude, teaching them that to be honored by future generations it would be but necessary to transmit to their posterity the name of rebels to the national authority; urged them to throw off all restraints of society and law, to sunder the bonds of maternal and fraternal love, and embark in a sea of wild,