War of the Rebellion: Serial 075 Page 0756 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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to Rome is thirty-eighth instead of forty-eight miles; I have travel the road and know it to be a good road. I think the enemy will reach there by to-morrow afternoon. We have no force at Blue Mountain, nor in advance of that point as far as I could ascertain. Colvin's regiment, Sixth Alabama, Clanton's brigade, which was thought to be there, left that place a week ago last Saturday for Army of Tennessee, and Blue Mountain and Rome, I could not hear of at all; I sent courier forward to ascertain its whereabouts. I will move forward with the forces that come up from below. There is very inadequate supply of forage for the number of horses coming forward. Please have orders given to have it brought forward as regularly and with as little delay as possible. The corn ought to be brought as much as practicable in the shuck, as the horses can not live on shelled corn alone. I will write to you every day by down trains.

Captain Gabbett told me at Blue Mountain that he had information through his scouts that a large portion of Patterson's regiment, Roddey's brigade, had been captured by the enemy.

Respectfully,

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

NEAR NEW HOPE CHURCH,

Paulding County, Ga., June 3, 1864.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Richmond:

Your dispatch of 2nd received. I have no knowledge of any assistance now on way from S. D. Lee and Forrest. Please inform me what movements of these forces are being made. My information is that the cavalry of Mississippi is a good deal dispersed, and I suppose for the defensive. Cavalry on the rear of Sherman, this side of the Tennessee, would do him much harm at present. Affairs here unchanged.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

NEW HOPE CHURCH, June 3, 1864.

Major General S. D. LEE,

Demopolis, Ala.:

If you can throw Chalmers and the cavalry brigade that you report as at Blue Mountain rapidly between Chattanooga and the railroad crossing of the Etowah, it may produce great results. That line is thinly guarded and Sherman's supplies deficient.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

MERIDIAN, June 3, 1864.

(Via Mobile. Received Richmond 4.25 4th.)

General S. COOPER:

Column which left Decatur was twenty-five miles above Gadsden on the 1st and moving to Sherman; estimated at 10,000. Could not reach it in time to strike. Column which left Memphis, estimated at 8,000, still moving east.

S. D. LEE,

Major-General.