War of the Rebellion: Serial 070 Page 0729 Chapter XLIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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narrow that it is impossible to penetrate their lines. They have large patrolling parties constantly in motion between their different posts. If you were familiar with the country, you would appreciate the difficulties of getting any certain information by scouting, and the condition of the atmosphere renders observation from the mountains impossible.

T. STURGIS DAVIS,

Commanding Outpost.

MOUNT JACKSON, May 11, 1864.

Major General J. C. BRECKINRIDGE:

The enemy drove in my pickets this morning at 10 o'clock. I had a slight skirmish with them, having 1 man wounded and 2 captured. They have, as far as came within my observation, 2,000 cavalry and six pieces of artillery. I heard from their rear to-day. They had the day before yesterday ten regiments infantry. They have now twenty-eight pieces artillery, all brass but four, and three mountain howitzers-a very large proportion, but correct. The whole force is 6,000 men. Major Gilmore reports for duty this evening; his battalion was ordered by the Secretary of War to report to me He says your ordered him to take his battalion and get to the enemy's rear. He has about forty men for duty. In my own company I have twenty-six. If he takes his own men away I will be left with no men for picket. I am on outpost duty. The impression here is that he is still in arrest under another series of charges. The information I have received from across the ridge is that [our] people hold possession of Culpeper County, and this being the case no force of enemy can penetrate to Madison Court-House. No force from the Valley has gone there.

T. STURGIS DAVIS,

Captain, Commanding Outpost.

MOUNT JACKSON, May 11, 1864.

Major General JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE:

Stragglers from General Imboden report that he had a fight yesterday morning with 500 Yankee cavalry near Baker's on Lost River; defeated them and pursued them toward Moorefield. I have sent several dispatches to him, but have received no reply. I will send another with your orders to-night. Captain Davis sends you a dispatch* in regard to Major Gilmor. Please decide the matter at once. It is impossible to spare any of the cavalry, of which we only have about sixty altogether, until General Imboden returns. I have directed Captain Davis to telegraph directly to you any movement of the enemy during the night. My camp is at Rude's Hill; my pickets below here.

G. H. SMITH,

Colonel, Commanding.

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*See next preceding.

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