War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0927 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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mill Point, a few miles below. The gunboats fired a few shells while the places were burning. I think the road should be torn up and the Potomac Railroad bridge burned, but there is an engineer officer here who talks about removing it, and removing the railroad iron.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. R. COLLINS,

Major, Commanding Fifteenth Cavalry.

BURWELL`S BAY, ISLE OF WIGHT COUNTY, June 23, 1863.

[Major WILLIAM NORRIS:]

I was not able to meet my confidential agent last night on the Lower Peninsula, as the Lower Peninsula is filled with provost-guards enrolling negroes nolens volens. I saw Mr. -, who informed me that Keyes` headquarters are at Fort Monroe. He thinks his forces do exceed 6, 000.

C. H. CAUSEY,

Captain, Signal Corps.

HDQRS. CAV. DIV., ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, June 24, 1863.

Brigadier General B. H. ROBERTSON,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: Your own and General Jones` brigades will cover the front of Ashby`s and Snicker`s Gaps, yourself, as senior officer, being in command.

Your object will be to watch the enemy; deceive him as to our designs, and harass his rear if you find he is retiring. Be always on the alert; let nothing escape your observation, and miss no opportunity which offers to damage the enemy.

After the enemy has moved beyond your reach, leave sufficient pickets in the mountains, withdraw to the west side of the Shenandoah, place a strong and reliable picket to watch the enemy at Harper`s Ferry, cross the Potomac, and follow the army, keeping on its right and rear.

As long as the enemy remains in your front in force, unless otherwise ordered by General R. E. Lee, Lieutenant-General Longstreet, or myself, hold the Gaps with a line of pickets reaching across the Shenandoah by Charlestown to the Potomac.

If, in the contingency mentioned, you withdraw, sweep the Valley clear of what pertains to the army, and cross the Potomac at the different points crossed by it.

You will instruct General Jones from time to time as the movements progress, or events may require, and report anything of importance to Lieutenant-General Longstreet, with whose position you will communicate by relays through Charlestown.

I send instructions for General Jones, which please read. Avail yourself of every means in your power to increase the efficiency of your command, and keep it up to the highest number possible. Particular attention will be paid to shoeing horses, and to marching off of the turnpike.

In case of an advance of the enemy, you will offer such resistance as will be justifiable to check him and discover his intentions and,