War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0789 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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The river would in all probability subside before you could get them in place. They are in charge of Captain Douglas, of the Engineers. Call upon him in my name if you desire them.

As regards General W. E. Jones, I have had it in my mind to make a change in the Valley, and order him to report with his brigade to you, and place the cavalry from Western Virginia there. I am perfectly willing to transfer him to Paxton's brigade if he desires it; but if he does not, I know of no act of his to justify my doing so. Do not left your judgment be warped. Hampton has probably joined you. Get your cavalry together, and give them breathing time, so as to when you do strike, Stoneman may feel you.

Very truly,

R. E. LEE,

General.

FREDERICKSBURG, May 9, 1863.

Major General SAMUEL JONES:

Direct General Jenkins with his cavalry to repair to Staunton or the most convenient point in the Valley, and report when he will arrive there.

R. E. LEE,

General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Dublin, May 9, 1863.

General R. E. LEE,

Fredericksburg:

Brigadier-General Jenkins has gone to report in person to Major-General Stuart. Eught of his companies ought to have reported to Stuart before now. I will order one of his regiments to Staunton immediately.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

FREDERICKSBURG, May 9, 1863.

General SAMUEL JONES,

Commanding Department of Western Virginia:

GENERAL: I have just received your letter of the 25th ultimo. I will endeavor to make the exchange of cavalry you propose. I have telegraphed you to send General Jenkins to Staunton, or the most convenient point to him in the Valley. Please let me know the time he may be expected to arrive there.

I know that General Jenkins is a gallant soldier, but am unacquainted with his administrative qualities.

How would cavalry in this part of Virginia.

You see how General Stoneman has been running wild over the State, cutting our railroads, &c., and even going to within sight of Richmond. He has twenty-eight regiments of cavalry, organized into four divisions, forming a cavalry corps under himself. He must be restricted in his operations or we shall be ruined. Where can we obtain re-enforcements