War of the Rebellion: Serial 040 Page 0757 Chapter XXXVII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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Our scattered condition favors their operations. I hope if any

re-enforcements can be sent, they may be forwarded immediately.

The bridges over the Annas ought to be guarded, if possible.

R. E. LEE,

[General.]

RICHMOND, VA., April 29, 1863.

Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: The demand which was looked for has come, and requires prompt attention.

General Lee send this morning the following dispatch:

FREDERICKSBURG, 29th.

The enemy is crossing below Deep Run, about The same place as before. The fog has been so thick during the and morning that we can only a few yards. Taken with the reports received from our left, it looks like a general advance; but where his main effort will be made, cannot say. Troops not wanted south of James River had better be moved in this direction, and all other necessary preparations made.

This, of course, involves rapid and immediate movement of troops and supplies, to enable General Lee to meet the enemy and sustain himself in whatever position it may be necessary to assume.

Very respectfully,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

RICHMOND, VA., April 29, 1863.

Major General D. H. HILL,

Commanding, &c., Goldsborough, N. C.:

GENERAL: The following telegram has just been received from General Lee:

The enemy is crossing below Deep Run, about the same place as before. The fog has been so thick during the night and morning that we can only see a few yards. Taken with the reports received from our left, it looks like a general advance; but where his main effort will be made, cannot say. Troops not wanted south of James River had better be moved in this direction, and all other necessary preparations made.

This renders it important that such forces as you deem judicious should be concentrated at Richmond, to be in supporting distance. General Lee may telegraph you. In absence of instructions from him, make such arrangements with above view as your judgment shall dictate. A like dispatch has been sent to Lieutenant-General Longstreet.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

APRIL 29, 1863.

General LONGSTREET:

The following dispatch has just been received from General Lee:

FREDERICKSBURG, VA., April 29, 1863.

The enemy is in large force on north bank of Rappahannock, opposite the railroad at Hamilton's Crossing. He is crossing troops the point at which he crossed in December, and extends lower down the river. I have discovered nothing lower