War of the Rebellion: Serial 035 Page 0397 Chapter XXXV. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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We cannot move south with security not having East Tennessee in our possession; he could not move north without holding it. Not having East Tennessee, our communications will be in danger if we move south. He cannot stay here if East Tennessee is in our hands.

Very respectfully, I remain, sir, your obedient servant,

J. B. TURCHIN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Second Cavalry Division.

FRANKLIN, June 8, 1863.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD, Chief of Staff:

Is there any such inspector-general as Lawrence Orton, colonel U. S. Army, and assistant, Major Dunlop?* If so, please describe their personal appearance, and answer immediately.

J. P. BAIRD,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, June 8, [1863]-10.15 p. m.

Colonel J. P. BAIRD, Franklin:

There are no such men as Insp. General Lawrence Orton, colonel U. S. Army, and assistant, Major Dunlop, in this army, nor in any army, so far as we know. Why do you ask?

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

FRANKLIN, June 8, 1863-11.30 p. m.

[Brigadier-General GARFIELD:]

Two men came in camp about dar, dressed in our uniform, with horses and equipments to correspond, saying that they were Colonel Orton, Inspector-general, and Major Dunlap, assistant, having an order from Adjutant-General Townsend and your order to inspect all posts, but their conduct was so singular that we have arrested them, and they insisted that it was important to go to Nashville to-night. The one representing himself as Colonel Orton [W. Orton Williams] is probably a regular officer of old army, but Colonel Watkins, commanding cavalry here, in whom I have the utmost confidence, is of opinion that they are spies, who have either forged or captured their orders. They can give no consistent account of their conduct.

I want you to answer immediately my last dispatch. I take so long to get an answer immediately my last dispatch. It takes so long to get and answer from General [Gordon] Granger, at Triune, by signal, that I telegraphed General [R. S.] Granger, at Nashville, for information. I also signaled General Gordeon Granger. If these men are spies, it seems to me that it is important that I should know it, because Forrest must be awaiting their progress.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

J. P. BAIRD,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

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*See Rosecrans to L. Thomas, June 12, p. 424.

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