War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 1046 OPERATIONS IN N.VA.,W.VA.,MD., AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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matters in which the Department my facilitate your arduous and responsible duties, and to assure you of the great consideration and respect of yours, most respectfully,

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, December 4, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel COLE,

Chief Commissary, Army of Northern Virginia:

COLONEL: The commanding general wishes you to advise commissaries of corps and divisions that they will issue three days' rations, to be kept on hand for sudden move, in addition to the supplies for daily consumption. Some misunderstanding existing upon this subject, Major Moses has declined issuing provisions, in accordance with General Lee's verbal order heretofore given on this subject.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHILTON,

Acting Adjutant and Inspector General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA,

No. 130.

December 4, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel B. G. Baldwin, Provisional Army, Confederate States, having reported at these headquarters, in conformity with orders from the Secretary of War, is announced as chief of ordnance of the Army of Northern Virginia, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. Lieutenant Colonel E. P. Alexander, having been assigned to the command of the battalion of artillery recently under Colonel S. D. Lee, is relieved from the duties of his former office.

By order of General R. E. Lee:

W. H. TAYLOR,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, December 5, 1862.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR, Richmond:

SIR: During the past camping I have felt, in every battle, the advantages that the enemy possessed over us in their artillery. This arose in part from their possessing more experienced artillerists and better prepared ammunition, but consisted chiefly in better guns. These advantages, I am happy to state, are gradually diminishing. Our artillerists are greatly improving, our ammunition is more carefully prepared,and the efficiency of our batteries increased by guns captured from the enemy. I am greatly in need of longer range smooth-bore guns, and propose that, if metal cannot otherwise be procured, a portion, if not all, of our 6-pounder smooth-bores (bronze), and, if necessary, a part of our 12-pounder howitzers, be recast into 12-pounder Napoleons. The best guns for field service, in my opinion, are the 12-pounder Napoleons, the 10-pounder Parrotts, and the approved 3-inch rifles. Batteries composed of such guns would simplify our ammunition, give us less metal to transport, and longer and more accurate range of fire. I